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Household Demand for Low Carbon Policies: Evidence from California

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  • Matthew J. Holian
  • Matthew E. Kahn

Abstract

In recent years, Californians have voted on two key pieces of low carbon regulation. One introduces a carbon cap-and-trade market and the other creates a plan to build a high-speed rail system connecting the state's major cities. This provides an opportunity to examine the demand for carbon mitigation efforts. Household voting patterns are found to mirror the voting patterns by the US Congress on national carbon legislation. Political liberals and more educated voters favor such regulations while suburbanites tend to oppose such initiatives. By pricing carbon, suburban land becomes less valuable. We find that homeowner communities in suburban areas are more likely to vote against such regulation, while homeowners in the center city area are more likely to favor carbon pricing. Homeowner communities close to high-speed rail stops are also more likely to support this legislation.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew J. Holian & Matthew E. Kahn, 2015. "Household Demand for Low Carbon Policies: Evidence from California," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(2), pages 205-234.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jaerec:doi:10.1086/680663
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Lessons from Urban Economics for the Politics of Expanding Investment in Pre-K Early Education
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2015-05-31 08:06:00
    2. Weitzman on "When does the world wake up and address climate change?"
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2015-06-04 20:50:00
    3. Interest Groups and the Competition Between Green and Dirty Technologies
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2015-09-05 20:17:00
    4. The Economics of Red State vs. Blue State Carbon Politics
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2015-10-23 18:40:00
    5. U.S Climate Politics: An Economist's Perspective
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-01-05 22:05:00
    6. Partisan Climate Politics Continues
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-05-28 00:51:00
    7. Some Comments on Dr. Krugman's Recent Climate Change Piece
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-06-03 22:34:00
    8. Why the Clinton Campaign Won't Speak About Carbon Taxes
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-07-20 20:44:00
    9. Will Progressives Pay Climate Skeptics to Stop Polluting?
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-09-15 18:12:00
    10. The Economics of California's AB32 Revisted
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2016-12-12 22:05:00
    11. Will Pollution Increase During Mr. Trump's Presidency?
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-02-06 21:40:00
    12. California's Cap & Trade and Suburban Pocketbook Expenditure Dynamics
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-04-17 01:56:00
    13. Some Nuances Concerning President Trump's Recent Decision on the Paris Treaty
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-06-02 18:51:00
    14. An Economic Explanation for Why Republicans Do Not Prioritize Fighting Climate Change
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-06-04 08:55:00
    15. One Comment on Dr. Krugman's NY Times Column
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2017-06-05 21:52:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhongmin Wang & Cheng Xu, 2016. "Using Donations to the Green Party to Measure Community Environmentalism," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(3), pages 1784-1790.
    2. repec:eee:reecon:v:71:y:2017:i:2:p:225-235 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Altonji, Matthew & Lang, Corey & Puggioni, Gavino, 2016. "Can urban areas help sustain the preservation of open space? Evidence from statewide referenda," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 82-91.
    4. Georgic, Will C. & Klaiber, Allen, 2018. "Identifying the Costs to Homeowners of Eliminating NFIP Subsidies," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274444, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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