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Immigration policy and counterterrorism

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  • Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu
  • Sandler, Todd

Abstract

In a developing country, terrorists recruit and allocate their capital, skilled labor, and unskilled labor between domestic and foreign targets. Domestic targets require less skilled labor than foreign targets. Under various strategic scenarios, we show how countermeasures against the different terrorist inputs alter the amount and mix of targets, as well as how skilled and unskilled immigration quotas by a targeted foreign country affect this mix of attacks. We find that increases in skilled labor quotas generally reduce terrorist attacks in the foreign country, especially when the terrorists reside in a skill-scarce country. A number of different strategic scenarios, including leader–follower, are investigated.

Suggested Citation

  • Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Sandler, Todd, 2014. "Immigration policy and counterterrorism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 112-123.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:110:y:2014:i:c:p:112-123
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpubeco.2013.12.013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Böhmelt, Tobias & Bove, Vincenzo, 2017. "How Migration Policies Moderate the Diffusion of Terrorism," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 349, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    2. Axel Dreher & Martin Gassebner & Paul Schaudt, 2017. "The Effect of Migration on Terror - Made at Home or Imported from Abroad?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6441, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Garcia-Alonso, Maria D.C. & Levine, Paul & Smith, Ron, 2016. "Military aid, direct intervention and counterterrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 112-135.
    4. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Sandler, Todd & Younas, Javed, 2017. "Terms-of-Trade and Counterterrorism Externalities," Working Papers 2017-17, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    5. Abdulrahman ALRASSI, 2014. "Counterterrorism Efforts Of Saudi Arabia In Create Stability Of The World," SEA - Practical Application of Science, Fundația Română pentru Inteligența Afacerii, Editorial Department, issue 5, pages 117-122, November.
    6. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Sandler, Todd, 2014. "The effects of terrorism on trade: a factor supply approach," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 96(3), pages 229-241.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transnational terrorism; Immigration; International externalities; Counterterrorism policy; Developing country;

    JEL classification:

    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H87 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - International Fiscal Issues; International Public Goods

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