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The Economics Of Terrorism




"This paper treats terrorism as an" economic phenomenon-"as a way to understand it and to control it. It uses the tools of substitution, innovation, and cycles and concludes by noting the importance of intelligence and that the most valuable approach to defeating terrorism is that of denying resources to the terrorists rather than attempting to protect assets at risk. It notes that we are probably not any safer than before the implementation of the post-9/11 strategies and emphasizes that new initiatives must be undertaken to prevent terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction." Copyright (c) 2010 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael D. Intriligator, 2010. "The Economics Of Terrorism," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(1), pages 1-13, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:48:y:2010:i:1:p:1-13

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Faria Joao Ricardo, 2003. "Terror Cycles," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-11, April.
    2. Alberto Abadie, 2006. "Poverty, Political Freedom, and the Roots of Terrorism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 50-56, May.
    3. Alan B. Krueger & Jitka Maleckova, 2003. "Education, Poverty and Terrorism: Is There a Causal Connection?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 119-144, Fall.
    4. Sandler, Todd & Enders, Walter, 2004. "An economic perspective on transnational terrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 301-316, June.
    5. Landes, William M, 1978. "An Economic Study of U.S. Aircraft Hijacking, 1961-1976," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-31, April.
    6. Alan B. Krueger, 2007. "Introduction to What Makes a Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism," Introductory Chapters,in: What Makes a Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism Princeton University Press.
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    Cited by:

    1. McBride, Michael & Hewitt, David, 2013. "The enemy you can’t see: An investigation of the disruption of dark networks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 32-50.
    2. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Sandler, Todd, 2014. "Immigration policy and counterterrorism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 112-123.
    3. Reza Oladi & John Gilbert, 2015. "International Narcotics Trade, Foreign Aid, And Enforcement," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(3), pages 1630-1646, July.

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