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Hit and (they will) run: The impact of terrorism on migration

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  • Dreher, Axel
  • Krieger, Tim
  • Meierrieks, Daniel

Abstract

We analyze the influence of terrorism on migration for 152 countries during 1976-2000. We find robust evidence that terrorism is among the 'push factors' of skilled migration, whereas it is not robustly associated with average migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Dreher, Axel & Krieger, Tim & Meierrieks, Daniel, 2011. "Hit and (they will) run: The impact of terrorism on migration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 42-46, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:113:y:2011:i:1:p:42-46
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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