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The effects of terrorism on trade: a factor supply approach

Author

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  • Todd Sandler
  • Subhayu Bandyopadhyay

Abstract

The conventional view of terrorism is that it raises risks and, as a result, reduces trade. The authors use a factor supply approach to show that this hypothesis is not necessarily correct. They use a two-good, two-factor, small open economy model to show that terrorism can either reduce or raise trade depending on critical factors, such as the impact of terrorism on the intensive factor of the export or the import sector. They then extend the analysis to models with several goods and factors and identify conditions under which trade may rise or fall with a greater incidence of terrorism. Finally, they provide an analysis of the effects of terrorism on trade in the presence of an optimal counterterrorism policy. The authors find that a nation?s adjustment of its counterterrorism level in response to a greater terrorist threat may moderate the impact of terrorism on trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Todd Sandler & Subhayu Bandyopadhyay, 2014. "The effects of terrorism on trade: a factor supply approach," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, pages 229-241.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrv:00026
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blomberg, S. Brock & Hess, Gregory D. & Weerapana, Akila, 2004. "Economic conditions and terrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 463-478, June.
    2. Khusrav Gaibulloev & Todd Sandier, 2011. "The Adverse Effect of Transnational and Domestic Terrorism on Growth in Africa," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 48(3), pages 355-371, May.
    3. Peter Egger & Martin Gassebner, 2015. "International terrorism as a trade impediment?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(1), pages 42-62.
    4. Bandyopadhyay, Subhayu & Sandler, Todd, 2014. "Immigration policy and counterterrorism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 112-123.
    5. Enders,Walter & Sandler,Todd, 2012. "The Political Economy of Terrorism," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521181006, December.
    6. Nitsch, Volker & Schumacher, Dieter, 2004. "Terrorism and international trade: an empirical investigation," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 423-433, June.
    7. Khusrav Gaibulloev & Todd Sandler, 2008. "Growth Consequences of Terrorism in Western Europe," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 411-424, August.
    8. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Todd Sandler & Javed Younas, 2014. "Foreign direct investment, aid, and terrorism," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(1), pages 25-50, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. De Sousa, José & Mirza, Daniel & Verdier, Thierry, 2018. "Terror networks and trade: Does the neighbor hurt?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 27-56.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F52 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - National Security; Economic Nationalism
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War

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