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Effects of income inequality on China's economic growth

Author

Listed:
  • Qin, Duo
  • Cagas, Marie Anne
  • Ducanes, Geoffrey
  • He, Xinhua
  • Liu, Rui
  • Liu, Shiguo

Abstract

A pilot empirical study is carried out on how income inequality affects growth through incorporating panel data information into a quarterly macro-econometric model of China. Provincial urban and rural household data are used to construct income inequality measures, which are then used to augment household consumption equations in the model. Model simulations test the inequality effect on GDP growth and its components. Results show that income inequality forms robust explanatory variables of consumption and that the way inequality develops carries negative consequences on GDP and sectoral growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Qin, Duo & Cagas, Marie Anne & Ducanes, Geoffrey & He, Xinhua & Liu, Rui & Liu, Shiguo, 2009. "Effects of income inequality on China's economic growth," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 69-86.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:31:y:2009:i:1:p:69-86
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tingting Li & Hualou Long & Shuangshuang Tu & Yanfei Wang, 2015. "Analysis of Income Inequality Based on Income Mobility for Poverty Alleviation in Rural China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(12), pages 1-17, December.
    2. Ampudia, Miguel & Pavlickova, Akmaral & Slacalek, Jiri & Vogel, Edgar, 2016. "Household heterogeneity in the euro area since the onset of the Great Recession," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 181-197.
    3. Hamideh Mohtashami Borzadaran & Mehdi Behname & Sayed Mahdi Mostafavi, 2013. "Natural Resources, Openness and Income Inequality in Iran," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 16(49), pages 3-26, September.
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:2:p:121:d:63084 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Nguyen, Duy Loi & Nguyen, Binh Giang & Tran, Thi Ha & Vo, Thi Minh Le & Nguyen, Dinh Ngan, 2014. "Employment, Earnings and Social Protection for Female Workers in Vietnam’s Informal Sector," MPRA Paper 61989, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Herzer, Dierk & Vollmer, Sebastian, 2013. "Rising top incomes do not raise the tide," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 504-519.
    7. Fang Yang & Shiying Pan & Xin Yao, 2016. "Regional Convergence and Sustainable Development in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(2), pages 1-15, January.
    8. Yu, Kang & Xin, Xian & Guo, Ping & Liu, Xiaoyun, 2011. "Foreign direct investment and China's regional income inequality," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1348-1353, May.
    9. Silver, Steven D. & Verbrugge, Randal, 2010. "Home production and endogenous economic growth," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 297-312, August.
    10. Zhang, Shuguang & Cheng, Lian, 2010. "The Achilles' heels of growth: factor price distortion and consequential adverse wealth transfers in China," MPRA Paper 34710, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:62:y:2017:i:02:n:s0217590815501167 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:gam:jsusta:v:7:y:2015:i:12:p:16362-16378:d:60411 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Cheong, Tsun Se & Wu, Yanrui, 2013. "Regional disparity, transitional dynamics and convergence in China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-14.
    14. repec:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:40:p:4083-4098 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Marina Malkina, 2014. "Study of the relationship between the development level and degree of income inequality in the Russian regions," Economy of region, Centre for Economic Security, Institute of Economics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, vol. 1(2), pages 238-248.
    16. Mario Holzner, 2013. "Inequality and the Crisis: A Causal Inference Analysis," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 110, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    17. Yingru Li, 2012. "The spatial variation of China's regional inequality in human development," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 263-278, August.
    18. Piotr Pietraszewski, 2016. "Microeconomic fundamentals of the aggregate production function with constant returns to scale," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 45.
    19. Sebastian Leitner, 2013. "Analysis of Short and Medium Term Crisis Effects on Welfare and Poverty in SEE: Stress Testing Bulgarian and Romanian Households," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 111, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    20. Michel De Vroey, 2010. "Getting rid of Keynes ? A survey of the history of macroeconomics from Keynes to Lucas and beyond," Working Paper Research 187, National Bank of Belgium.
    21. Duc Khuong Nguyen & Benoît Sévi & Bo Sjö & Gazi Salah Uddin, 2017. "The role of trade openness and investment in examining the energy-growth-pollution nexus: empirical evidence for China and India," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(40), pages 4083-4098, August.

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