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Stock market volatility and international business cycle dynamics: Evidence from OECD economies

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  • Vu, Nam T.

Abstract

How does a surprise movement in stock market volatility affect our forecasts of future output across countries? This paper studies the time series and cross-sectional responses of output to variation in stock market volatility across 27 countries over 40 years, controlling for a number of country-specific characteristics. High levels of stock market volatility are detrimental to future output growth not only after financial crises as previously emphasized in the literature, but also in non-crisis periods. Output growth and interest rates react negatively to a random shock to volatility and revert to their means quickly thereafter. Moreover, these results are robust after controlling for economic policy uncertainty, the level of financial development, and the direction of the market.

Suggested Citation

  • Vu, Nam T., 2015. "Stock market volatility and international business cycle dynamics: Evidence from OECD economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 1-15.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:50:y:2015:i:c:p:1-15
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jimonfin.2014.08.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Laurent Ferrara & Pierre Guérin, 2018. "What are the macroeconomic effects of high‐frequency uncertainty shocks?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 33(5), pages 662-679, August.
    2. Bevilacqua, Mattia & Morelli, David & Tunaru, Radu, 2019. "The determinants of the model-free positive and negative volatilities," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 1-24.
    3. Kang, Wensheng & Ratti, Ronald A. & Vespignani, Joaquin L., 2019. "Revising the Impact of Global Commodity Prices and Global Stock Market Volatility Shocks: Effects across Countries," MPRA Paper 103035, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Chikashi Tsuji, 2016. "Time-varying International Effects of Japanese Stock Prices on US and Canadian Stock Markets," Applied Economics and Finance, Redfame publishing, vol. 3(3), pages 81-92, August.
    5. Berg, Kimberly A. & Vu, Nam T., 2019. "International spillovers of U.S. financial volatility," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 19-34.
    6. Yunus, Nafeesa, 2020. "Time-varying linkages among gold, stocks, bonds and real estate," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 165-185.
    7. Vespignani, Joaquin & Kang, Wensheng & Ratti, Ronald, 2018. "Global Commodity Prices and Global Stock Volatility Shocks," MPRA Paper 84250, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Kang, Wensheng & Ratti, Ronald A. & Vespignani, Joaquin, 2020. "Global commodity prices and global stock market volatility shocks: Effects across countries," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    9. Borjigin, Sumuya & Yang, Yating & Yang, Xiaoguang & Sun, Leilei, 2018. "Econometric testing on linear and nonlinear dynamic relation between stock prices and macroeconomy in China," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 493(C), pages 107-115.
    10. Chikashi Tsuji, 2016. "Effects of the Japanese Stock Market on Canadian Value Stocks," Journal of Management and Strategy, Journal of Management and Strategy, Sciedu Press, vol. 7(2), pages 21-30, May.
    11. Mohammadi, H. & Abolhasani, L. & Shahnoushi, N. & Shabanian, F., 2018. "The effects of business cycle indicators on stock market indices of food industry in Iran," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277425, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stock market volatility; Output growth; Heterogeneous panel causality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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