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Employment Effects of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Robert Baumann

    ()

    (College of the Holy Cross, Worcester)

  • Bryan Engelhardt

    ()

    (College of the Holy Cross,Worcester)

  • Victor A. Matheson

    ()

    (College of the Holy Cross,Worcester)

Local, state, and federal governments, along with the Salt Lake City Organizing Committee, spent roughly $1.9 billion in planning and hosting the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. Event promoters suggested that the Games would increase employment in the state by 35,000 job-years. We investigate whether the 2002 Winter Olympics actually increased employment finding that the Games’ impact was a fraction of that claimed by the boosters. While the Salt Lake City Olympics did increase employment overall by between 4,000 and 7,000 jobs, these gains were concentrated in the leisure industry, and the Games had little to no effect on employment after 12 months.

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Article provided by Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics in its journal Journal of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 232 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 308-317

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Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:232:y:2012:i:3:p:308-317
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