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Do Good Olympics Make Good Neighbors?

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  • MICHAEL A. LEEDS

Abstract

"Most studies of mega-events such as Olympic Games find a relatively small impact on the cities that host them. One reason given for this finding is that the event displaces tourists who otherwise would have come to the city. This paper documents such displacement by showing that expenditure at ski resorts in Colorado rose as a result of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. In addition to supporting previous studies, the spillover effect suggests that cities and states that gain from spillovers might want to support bids for events by nearby cities." Copyright (c) 2008 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael A. Leeds, 2008. "Do Good Olympics Make Good Neighbors?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(3), pages 460-467, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:26:y:2008:i:3:p:460-467
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1465-7287.2007.00067.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dennis Coates, 2006. "The Tax Benefits of Hosting the Super Bowl and the MLB All-Star Game: The Houston Experience," International Journal of Sport Finance, Fitness Information Technology, vol. 1(4), pages 239-252, November.
    2. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Robert E. Moore & Stephanie M. Zobay, 2003. "Impact of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games on Employment and Wages in Georgia," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 69(3), pages 691-704, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Arne Feddersen & Wolfgang Maennig, 2013. "Mega-Events And Sectoral Employment: The Case Of The 1996 Olympic Games," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(3), pages 580-603, July.
    2. Dennis Coates, 2012. "Not-So-Mega Events," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Mega Sporting Events, chapter 23 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Feddersen, Arne & Maennig, Wolfgang, 2012. "Sectoral labour market effects of the 2006 FIFA World Cup," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 860-869.
    4. Robert A. BAADE & Robert W. BAUMANN & Victor A. MATHESON, 2010. "Slippery Slope ? Assessing The Economic Impact Of The 2002 Winter Olympic Games In Salt Lake City, Utah," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 31, pages 81-92.
    5. Douglas Barrios & Stuart Russell & Matt Andrews, 2016. "Bringing Home the Gold? A Review of the Economic Impact of Hosting Mega-Events," CID Working Papers 320, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    6. Baumann Robert & Engelhardt Bryan & Matheson Victor A., 2012. "Employment Effects of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 232(3), pages 308-317, June.

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