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Slippery Slope? Assessing the Economic Impact of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah

Author

Listed:
  • Robert Baade

    () (Department of Economics and Business, Lake Forest College)

  • Robert Baumann

    () (Department of Economics, College of the Holy Cross)

  • Victor Matheson

    () (Department of Economics, College of the Holy Cross)

Abstract

This paper provides an empirical examination of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah. Our analysis of taxable sales in the counties in which Olympic events took place finds that some sectors such as hotels and restaurants prospered while other retailers such as general merchandisers and department stores suffered. Overall the gains in the hospitality industry are lower than the losses experienced by other sectors in the economy. Given the experience of Utah, potential Olympic hosts should exercise caution before proceeding down the slippery slope of bidding for this event.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Baade & Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson, 2008. "Slippery Slope? Assessing the Economic Impact of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah," Working Papers 0815, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hcx:wpaper:0815
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    File URL: http://web.holycross.edu/RePEc/hcx/HC0815-Matheson-Baade-Baumann_WinterOlympics.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Florian Hagn & Wolfgang Maennig, 2007. "Short-term to long-term employment effects of the Football World Cup 1974 in Germany," Working Papers 0721, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
    2. Florian Hagn & Wolfgang Maennig, 2007. "Labour Market Effects of the 2006 Soccer World Cup in Germany," Working Papers 0716, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
    3. Michael A. Leeds, 2008. "Do Good Olympics Make Good Neighbors?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(3), pages 460-467, July.
    4. Robert Baade & Victor Matheson, 2000. "Bidding for the Olympics: Fools Gold?," IASE Conference Papers 0007, International Association of Sports Economists.
    5. Stephanie Jasmand & Wolfgang Maennig, 2007. "Regional Income and Employment Effects of the 1972 Munich Olympic Summer Games," Working Papers 0712, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
    6. Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson & Chihiro Muroi, 2008. "Bowling in Hawaii: Examining the Effectiveness of Sports-Based Tourism Strategies," Working Papers 0808, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    7. Robert Baade & Victor Matheson, 2004. "The Quest for the Cup: Assessing the Economic Impact of the World Cup," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 343-354.
    8. Hagn, Florian & Maennig, Wolfgang, 2008. "Employment effects of the Football World Cup 1974 in Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 1062-1075, October.
    9. Florian Hagn & Wolfgang Maennig, 2009. "Large sport events and unemployment: the case of the 2006 soccer World Cup in Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(25), pages 3295-3302.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert Baumann & Bryan Engelhardt & Victor A. Matheson, 2012. "Labor Market Effects of the World Cup: A Sectoral Analysis," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Mega Sporting Events, chapter 22 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Victor Matheson, 2012. "Assessing the infrastructure impact of mega-events in emerging economies," Working Papers 1203, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    3. Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson, 2013. "Infrastructure Investments and Mega-Sports Events: Comparing the Experience of Developing and Industrialized Countries," Working Papers 1305, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    4. Feddersen, Arne & Maennig, Wolfgang, 2012. "Sectoral labour market effects of the 2006 FIFA World Cup," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 860-869.
    5. Robert A. Baade & Victor A. Matheson, 2016. "Going for the Gold: The Economics of the Olympics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 201-218, Spring.
    6. Douglas Barrios & Stuart Russell & Matt Andrews, 2016. "Bringing Home the Gold? A Review of the Economic Impact of Hosting Mega-Events," CID Working Papers 320, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    7. John K. Wilson & Richard Pomfret, 2014. "Public Policy and Professional Sports," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15381.
    8. John C. Whitehead & Pamela Wicker, 2017. "Using Willingness to Travel to Estimate the Monetary Value of Intangible Benefits Derived from Active Sport Event Tourism," Working Papers 17-03, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    9. Calvin Jones & Max Munday & Neil Roche, 2010. "Can regional sports stadia ever be economically significant?," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(1), pages 63-77, June.
    10. M. de Nooij & M.R. van den Berg, 2013. "The bidding paradox: why rational politicians still want to bid for mega sports events," Working Papers 13-09, Utrecht School of Economics.
    11. Robert Baumann & Bryan Engelhardt & Victor Matheson, 2010. "The Labor Market Effects of the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics," Working Papers 1002, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    12. Robert Baumann & Bryan Engelhardt & Victor Matheson, 2009. "Hail to the Chief: Assessing the Economic Impact of Presidential Inaugurations on the Washington, D.C. Local Economy," Working Papers 0901, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Olympics; impact analysis; mega-event; tourism; sports;

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R53 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Public Facility Location Analysis; Public Investment and Capital Stock
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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