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Reducing transatlantic barriers on U.S.-EU agri-food trade: What are the possible gains?

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  • Arita, Shawn
  • Beckman, Jayson
  • Mitchell, Lorraine

Abstract

In recent years, the EU and the U.S. have engaged in discussions to lower trade and investment barriers and strengthen transatlantic integration. For food and agricultural trade, non-tariff measures (NTMs) such as sanitary and phytosanitary measures (SPS) stand out as significant barriers. This study combines sector-level econometric modeling with an agriculture-focused computable generable equilibrium (CGE) model to simulate various transatlantic liberalization scenarios on U.S.-EU agri-food trade. The simulations quantify the effect from tariff removal and addressing NTMs. The magnitude of the gains depend upon the level of tariff liberalization, the depth of integration, and possible consumer demand changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Arita, Shawn & Beckman, Jayson & Mitchell, Lorraine, 2017. "Reducing transatlantic barriers on U.S.-EU agri-food trade: What are the possible gains?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 233-247.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:233-247
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.12.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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