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Do they always say no? German consumers and second-generation GM foods

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  • Jochen Hartl
  • Roland Herrmann

Abstract

European consumers and, in particular, German consumers are known to be very critical toward the introduction of genetically modified (GM) foods. It is analyzed here whether German consumers do reject second-generation GM foods, too. Whereas first-generation GM crops induced producer-related benefits, second-generation GM crops are associated with consumer-oriented benefits like an improvement of nutritional quality. The determinants of demand for second-generation GM rapeseed oil are investigated within an online survey of 1,556 German consumers. It is elaborated how two functional properties of the product matter; that is, long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and the cholesterol-lowering effect of phytosterols. It turns out that GM rapeseed oil is neglected by 74% of all respondents. Output traits, however, will increase the probability of purchases of GM rapeseed oil. This is more the case for long-chain omega-3 fatty acids than for phytosterols. Copyright (c) 2009 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Jochen Hartl & Roland Herrmann, 2009. "Do they always say no? German consumers and second-generation GM foods," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 551-560, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:40:y:2009:i:5:p:551-560
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    Cited by:

    1. Richards, Timothy J. & Allender, William J. & Fang, Di, 2011. "Media Advertising and Ballot Initiatives: An Experimental Analysis," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114814, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Allender, William J. & Richards, Timothy J. & Fang, Di & Doyon, Maurice, 2011. "Media Advertising and Ballot Initiatives: An Experimental Analysis," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 104224, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Livingston, Michael J. & Mitchell, Lorraine & Wechsler, Seth, 2014. "Genetically Engineered Crops in the United States," Economic Research Report 164263, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Arita, Shawn & Beckman, Jayson & Mitchell, Lorraine, 2017. "Reducing transatlantic barriers on U.S.-EU agri-food trade: What are the possible gains?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 233-247.

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