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The dark side of team incentives: Experimental evidence on advice quality from financial service professionals

  • Danilov, Anastasia
  • Biemann, Torsten
  • Kring, Thorn
  • Sliwka, Dirk

In an experiment with professionals from the financial services sector, we investigate the impact of a team incentive scheme on the recommendation quality of investment products when advisors benefit from advising lower quality products. Experimental results reveal that, when group affiliation is strong, inferior products are recommended significantly more often under team incentives than under individual incentives.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 93 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 266-272

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:93:y:2013:i:c:p:266-272
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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