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Lying and age: An experimental study

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  • Glätzle-Rützler, Daniela
  • Lergetporer, Philipp

Abstract

Lying and deceiving is present not only in adults but also among children and teenagers and represents an economically and psychological relevant behavioral trait. It is therefore surprising that evidence from economic experiments on deceptive behavior in children and teenagers is scarce. In this paper, we study how age influences the propensity to tell “black” and “white” lies in a sample of 383 children and teenagers aged 10/11 and 15/16years. Our results show that a non-negligible fraction of subjects in both age cohorts exhibits lying-aversion and that the propensity to lie decreases significantly with age.

Suggested Citation

  • Glätzle-Rützler, Daniela & Lergetporer, Philipp, 2015. "Lying and age: An experimental study," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 12-25.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:46:y:2015:i:c:p:12-25
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joep.2014.11.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alm, James & Bruner, David M. & McKee, Michael, 2016. "Honesty or dishonesty of taxpayer communications in an enforcement regime," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 85-96.
    2. Martin G. Kocher & Simeon Schudy & Lisa Spantig, 2016. "I Lie? We Lie! Why? Experimental Evidence on a Dishonesty Shift in Groups," CESifo Working Paper Series 6008, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Houser, Daniel & List, John A. & Piovesan, Marco & Samek, Anya & Winter, Joachim, 2016. "Dishonesty: From parents to children," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 242-254.
    4. Grosch, Kerstin & Rau, Holger, 2017. "Gender differences in honesty: The role of social value orientation," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 308, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    5. Valeria Maggian & Marie Claire Villeval, 2016. "Social preferences and lying aversion in children," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 19(3), pages 663-685, September.
    6. Nives Della Valle & Matteo Ploner, 2017. "Reacting to Unfairness: Group Identity and Dishonest Behavior," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-19, July.
    7. Bernd Irlenbusch & Marie Claire Villeval, 2015. "Behavioral ethics: how psychology influenced economics and how economics might inform psychology?," Post-Print halshs-01159696, HAL.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    White lies; Lying; Deception; Experiment; Children; Teenagers;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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