IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/injoed/v61y2018icp40-54.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Health and education during industrialization: Evidence from early twentieth century Japan

Author

Listed:
  • Ogasawara, Kota

Abstract

By exploiting the detailed information available from the household surveys conducted in Tokyo after the First World War, this study investigates children's status in working-class households in Japan. Our analysis suggests that parental health shocks reduced the probability of girls attending secondary school by 29% in the case of maternal illness and 32% in the case of paternal illness. The sizable effect of parental health shocks on the schooling of girls confirms the gender bias in educational investment in urban working-class households in the early 1920s in Japan. Our finding also sheds light on the possibility that general improvements in parental health improved the educational attainment of their daughters. Although less than conclusive, part of human capital accumulation through educational investment in the prewar period, which accelerated postwar sustainable economic growth, might have been accelerated by improvements in the health status of people in the early 20th century.

Suggested Citation

  • Ogasawara, Kota, 2018. "Health and education during industrialization: Evidence from early twentieth century Japan," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 40-54.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:injoed:v:61:y:2018:i:c:p:40-54
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ijedudev.2017.10.025
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0738059317303309
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Eric V. Edmonds, 2005. "Does Child Labor Decline with Improving Economic Status?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(1).
    3. Björklund, Anders & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2011. "Education and Family Background: Mechanisms and Policies," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    4. repec:eee:socmed:v:181:y:2017:i:c:p:43-53 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Horrell, Sara & Meredith, David & Oxley, Deborah, 2009. "Measuring misery: Body mass, ageing and gender inequality in Victorian London," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 93-119, January.
    6. Bratti, Massimiliano & Mendola, Mariapia, 2014. "Parental health and child schooling," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 94-108.
    7. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    8. Beach, Brian & Ferrie, Joseph & Saavedra, Martin & Troesken, Werner, 2016. "Typhoid Fever, Water Quality, and Human Capital Formation," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 76(1), pages 41-75, March.
    9. Schultz, T. Paul, 2010. "Population and Health Policies," Handbook of Development Economics,, Elsevier.
    10. Sakari Saaritsa & Antti Kaihovaara, 2016. "Good for girls or bad for boys? Schooling, social inequality and intrahousehold allocation in early twentieth century Finland," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 10(1), pages 55-98, january.
    11. Sun, Ang & Yao, Yang, 2010. "Health shocks and children's school attainments in rural China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 375-382, June.
    12. Asfaw, Abay & von Braun, Joachim, 2004. "Is Consumption Insured against Illness? Evidence on Vulnerability of Households to Health Shocks in Rural Ethiopia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 115-129, October.
    13. Shin-Yi Chou & Jin-Tan Liu & Michael Grossman & Ted Joyce, 2010. "Parental Education and Child Health: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Taiwan," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 33-61, January.
    14. John A. James & Isao Suto, 2011. "Early twentieth-century Japanese worker saving: precautionary behaviour before a social safety net," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 5(1), pages 1-25, January.
    15. Kota Ogasawara & Genya Kobayashi, 2015. "The impact of social workers on infant mortality in inter-war Tokyo: Bayesian dynamic panel quantile regression with endogenous variables," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 9(1), pages 97-130, January.
    16. Sara Horrell & Deborah Oxley, 2012. "Bringing home the bacon? Regional nutrition, stature, and gender in the industrial revolution," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(4), pages 1354-1379, November.
    17. Humphries,Jane, 2010. "Childhood and Child Labour in the British Industrial Revolution," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521847568.
    18. Paul Gertler & Jonathan Gruber, 2002. "Insuring Consumption Against Illness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 51-70, March.
    19. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    20. Bester, C. Alan & Hansen, Christian B., 2016. "Grouped effects estimators in fixed effects models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 190(1), pages 197-208.
    21. Rebelo, Sergio, 1991. "Long-Run Policy Analysis and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 500-521, June.
    22. Paul Gertler & David I. Levine & Minnie Ames, 2004. "Schooling and Parental Death," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 211-225, February.
    23. Humphries, Jane, 1991. "'Bread and a Pennyworth of Treacle': Excess Female Mortality in England in the 1840s," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(4), pages 451-473, December.
    24. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2007. "The Economic Lives of the Poor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 141-168, Winter.
    25. Sara Horrell & Deborah Oxley, 1999. "Crust or crumb?: Intrahousehold resource allocation and male breadwinning in late Victorian Britain," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 52(3), pages 494-522, August.
    26. Jane Humphries, 2003. "Child Labor: Lessons from the Historical Experience of Today's Industrial Economies," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 175-196, December.
    27. Schneider, Eric B. & Ogasawara, Kota, 2017. "Disease and child growth in industrialising Japan: assessing instantaneous changes in growth and changes in the growth pattern, 1911-39," Economic History Working Papers 84066, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    28. HwaJung Choi, 2011. "Parents’ Health and Adult Children’s Subsequent Working Status: A Perspective of Intergenerational Transfer and Time Allocation," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 493-507, September.
    29. Furio Camillo Rosati & Mariacristina Rossi, 2003. "Children's Working Hours and School Enrollment: Evidence from Pakistan and Nicaragua," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 283-295, December.
    30. Alam, Shamma Adeeb, 2015. "Parental health shocks, child labor and educational outcomes: Evidence from Tanzania," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 161-175.
    31. Zorn, Christopher, 2005. "A Solution to Separation in Binary Response Models," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(2), pages 157-170, April.
    32. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tatsuki Inoue & Kota Ogasawara, 2018. "Chain effects of clean water: The Mills-Reincke phenomenon in early twentieth-century Japan," Papers 1805.00875, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2019.
    2. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:29:y:2018:i:c:p:198-210 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child education; Gender disparities; Historical data; Human capital; Intra-household resource allocation; Parental health;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • N35 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Asia including Middle East

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:injoed:v:61:y:2018:i:c:p:40-54. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/international-journal-of-educational-development .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.