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A Contribution To The Analysis Of The Economic Growth Of Qatar

  • EL-MEFLEH, Muhannad A.
  • SHOTAR, Manhal M.

This paper delineates the theoretical structure of the factors that determine economic growth in Qatar. The focal point of this paper is identifying the role of major macroeconomic variables that determine growth, namely; government spending, institutional settings, money supply, investment, inflation, education and the degree of economic openness. The major findings of this paper are that the empirical evidence indicates that the (1) various shocks explain different proportions of GDP movements over time, (2) GDP seems to be more susceptible to government spending and economic risk shocks than to other variables, and (3) education, investment, and monetary policy (general price level) shocks seem to have a moderate impact on GDP movements over the entire time horizon. Also, there was little evidence that the rest of the variables have an impact on economic growth.

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Article provided by Euro-American Association of Economic Development in its journal Applied Econometrics and International Development.

Volume (Year): 8 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 147-154

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Handle: RePEc:eaa:aeinde:v:8:y:2008:i:1_12
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