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The cross-market information content of stock and bond order flow

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  • Underwood, Shane

Abstract

In this paper I test the hypothesis that trading activity in the stock and bond markets contains important marketwide pricing information. Using a large sample of actively traded stocks and U.S. Treasury securities, I find that aggregate order imbalances play a strong role in explaining cross-market returns. I interpret this as evidence that aggregate order flow reveals information about the risk preferences, beliefs, and endowments of the investor population that is relevant for pricing securities in both markets. I also find evidence that cross-market hedging is an important source of linkages across the two markets, especially during periods of elevated equity volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Underwood, Shane, 2009. "The cross-market information content of stock and bond order flow," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 268-289, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finmar:v:12:y:2009:i:2:p:268-289
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Core versus périphérie : pourquoi les taux souverains sont-ils négativement corrélés ?
      by contact@captaineconomics.fr (Le Captain') in Captain Economics on 2012-11-23 12:00:02

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    Cited by:

    1. Fricke, Christoph & Menkhoff, Lukas, 2011. "Does the "Bund" dominate price discovery in Euro bond futures? Examining information shares," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 1057-1072, May.
    2. Smales, Lee A., 2013. "Bond futures and order imbalance," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 113-132.
    3. Ferreira Filipe, Sara, 2012. "Equity order flow and exchange rate dynamics," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 359-381.
    4. Kalimipalli, Madhu & Nayak, Subhankar & Perez, M. Fabricio, 2013. "Dynamic effects of idiosyncratic volatility and liquidity on corporate bond spreads," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2969-2990.
    5. Eric Girardin & Dijun Tan & Woon K. Wong, 2010. "Information Content of Order Flow and Cross-market Portfolio Rebalancing: Evidence for the Chinese Stock, Treasury and Corporate Bond Markets," Working Papers 022010, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    6. Bansal, Naresh & Connolly, Robert A. & Stivers, Chris, 2015. "Equity volatility as a determinant of future term-structure volatility," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 33-51.
    7. Aviral Kumar Tiwari & Juncal Cunado & Rangan Gupta & Mark E. Wohar, 2017. "Volatility Spillovers across Global Asset Classes: Evidence from Time and Frequency Domains," Working Papers 201780, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    8. repec:eee:jimfin:v:74:y:2017:i:c:p:137-146 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Chelley-Steeley, Patricia & Lambertides, Neophytos & Savva, Christos S., 2015. "The effect of security and market order flow shocks on co-movement," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 136-155.

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