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Restricted carbon emissions and directed R&D support; an applied general equilibrium analysis


  • Bye, Brita
  • Jacobsen, Karl


We analyse welfare effects of supporting general versus emission-saving technological development when carbon emissions are regulated by a carbon tax. We use a computable general equilibrium model with induced technological change (ITC). ITC is driven by two separate, economically motivated research and development (R&D) activities, one general and one emission-saving specified as carbon capture and storage (CCS). We study public revenue neutral policy alternatives targeted towards general R&D and CCS R&D. Support to general R&D is the welfare superior. However, the welfare gap between the two R&D policy alternatives is reduced with higher carbon tax levels. For sufficiently high levels of the carbon tax equal subsidy rates are preferred.

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  • Bye, Brita & Jacobsen, Karl, 2011. "Restricted carbon emissions and directed R&D support; an applied general equilibrium analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 543-555, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:33:y:2011:i:3:p:543-555

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Popp, David & Santen, Nidhi & Fisher-Vanden, Karen & Webster, Mort, 2013. "Technology variation vs. R&D uncertainty: What matters most for energy patent success?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 505-533.
    2. Wei Jin, 2012. "Can Technological Innovation Help China Take on Its Climate Responsibility? A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," CAMA Working Papers 2012-51, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    3. Jin, Wei, 2012. "Can technological innovation help China take on its climate responsibility? An intertemporal general equilibrium analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 629-641.
    4. Bistline, John E., 2016. "Energy technology R&D portfolio management: Modeling uncertain returns and market diffusion," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 183(C), pages 1181-1196.
    5. Anping Chen & Nicolaas Groenewold, 2013. "Regional Effects in China of an Emissions-Reduction Policy: Tax v. Subsidy," ERSA conference papers ersa13p1275, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Chen, Anping & Groenewold, Nicolaas, 2015. "Emission reduction policy: A regional economic analysis for China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 136-152.
    7. Lin Yang & Yunfei Yao & Jiutian Zhang & Xian Zhang & Karl J. McAlinden, 2016. "A CGE analysis of carbon market impact on CO2 emission reduction in China: a technology-led approach," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 81(2), pages 1107-1128, March.
    8. Nemet, Gregory F., 2012. "Inter-technology knowledge spillovers for energy technologies," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 1259-1270.
    9. Karen Maguire, 2013. " U.S. Energy Subsidies:Do They Reduce Electricity Generated CO2 Emissions?," Economics Working Paper Series 1402, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business, revised Jul 2013.
    10. David Popp & Nidhi Santen & Karen Fisher-Vanden & Mort Webster, 2012. "Technology Variation vs. R&D Uncertainty: What Matters Most for Energy Patent Success?," NBER Working Papers 17792, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Zuzana KRISTKOVA, 2013. "Analysis of Private R&D Effects in a CGE Model with Capital Varieties: The Case of the Czech Republic," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 63(3), pages 262-287, July.


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