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U.S. Energy Subsidies:Do They Reduce Electricity Generated CO2 Emissions?

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Listed:
  • Karen Maguire

    () (Oklahoma State University)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the influence of energy subsidies, Department of Energy (DOE) budget, U.S. government R&D spending on energy, and energy tax expenditures, on CO2 emissions from fossil fuels in the electricity market. The findings indicate that between 1990 and 2010 increases in DOE Outlays led to decreases in CO2 emissions from both fossil fuels generally and coal specifically; however, the magnitude of the contemporaneous effect is small. The effects varied by states, those with marginal wind potential were more strongly affected than states with significant wind resources. R&D spending did not have a contemporaneous influence on emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Karen Maguire, 2013. " U.S. Energy Subsidies:Do They Reduce Electricity Generated CO2 Emissions?," Economics Working Paper Series 1402, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business, revised Jul 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:okl:wpaper:1402
    as

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    File URL: https://business.okstate.edu/site-files/docs/ecls-working-papers/OKSWP1402.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David, Paul A. & Hall, Bronwyn H. & Toole, Andrew A., 2000. "Is public R&D a complement or substitute for private R&D? A review of the econometric evidence," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4-5), pages 497-529, April.
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    3. Vedenov, Dmitry & Wetzstein, Michael, 2008. "Toward an optimal U.S. ethanol fuel subsidy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2073-2090, September.
    4. Kalkuhl, Matthias & Edenhofer, Ottmar & Lessmann, Kai, 2013. "Renewable energy subsidies: Second-best policy or fatal aberration for mitigation?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 217-234.
    5. Fischer, Carolyn & Newell, Richard G., 2008. "Environmental and technology policies for climate mitigation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 142-162, March.
    6. Bye, Brita & Jacobsen, Karl, 2011. "Restricted carbon emissions and directed R&D support; an applied general equilibrium analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 543-555, May.
    7. Uwe Schneider & Bruce McCarl, 2003. "Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 24(4), pages 291-312, April.
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    10. Hutchinson Emma & Kennedy Peter W & Martinez Cristina, 2010. "Subsidies for the Production of Cleaner Energy: When Do They Cause Emissions to Rise?," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-11, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy; Subsidy; Renewable Energy; Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies

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