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The tempest: Short- and long-term consequences of a natural disaster for children׳s development

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  • Deuchert, Eva
  • Felfe, Christina

Abstract

This paper analyzes the short- and long-run consequences of a natural disaster on children׳s education and health. The particular focus lies on variation in idiosyncratic shocks to households using housing damages caused by a super typhoon as a proxy. Relying on individual panel data and a setting in which typhoons are a relatively rare event, we find negative and persistent effects on children׳s education but no effects on children׳s health. Effects on education are likely driven by a shift in parental investments made to cope with the economic consequences of typhoon damages. Subgroup analysis suggests that results are stronger for girls, children with no older siblings, children from poor families, and families with no strong family or social network.

Suggested Citation

  • Deuchert, Eva & Felfe, Christina, 2015. "The tempest: Short- and long-term consequences of a natural disaster for children׳s development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 280-294.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:80:y:2015:i:c:p:280-294
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2015.09.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Herrera Almanza, Catalina & Cas, Ava, 2017. "Resilience to Shocks during Adolescence and Later Human Capital Outcomes: Evidence from Natural Disasters in the Philippines," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 259129, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Groppo, Valeria & Kraehnert, Kati, 2016. "Extreme Weather Events and Child Height: Evidence from Mongolia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 59-78.
    3. Marcotte, Dave E., 2017. "Something in the air? Air quality and children's educational outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 141-151.
    4. Krzysztof Karbownik & Anthony Wray, 2019. "Long-Run Consequences of Exposure to Natural Disasters," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(3), pages 949-1007.
    5. Valeria Groppo & Kati Kraehnert, 2017. "The impact of extreme weather events on education," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 433-472, April.
    6. Giuliano Masiero & Michael Santarossa, 2019. "Earthquakes, grants and public expenditure: how municipalities respond to natural disasters," IdEP Economic Papers 1901, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
    7. Sakai, Yoko & Estudillo, Jonna P. & Fuwa, Nobuhiko & Higuchi, Yuki & Sawada, Yasuyuki, 2017. "Do Natural Disasters Affect the Poor Disproportionately? Price Change and Welfare Impact in the Aftermath of Typhoon Milenyo in the Rural Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 16-26.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child development; Natural disaster; Idiosyncratic shock;

    JEL classification:

    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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