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The Tempest: Natural Disasters, Early Shocks and Children's Short- and Long-Run Development

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  • Eva Deuchert
  • Christina Felfe

Abstract

Economic theory predicts that adverse shocks during early childhood have detrimental short- and long-run consequences for children’s development. We examine this hypothesis by analyzing the short-and long-run effects on children’s health and education of a specific shock: housing damages caused by a super typhoon. Our results reveal negative effects on children’s education - not, however, on health. The effects on children’s education aggravate over time. Empirical evidence indicates that the main underlying channel is a shock on families’ wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Eva Deuchert & Christina Felfe, 2013. "The Tempest: Natural Disasters, Early Shocks and Children's Short- and Long-Run Development," CESifo Working Paper Series 4168, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_4168
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp4168.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Yoshito Takasaki, 2013. "Do natural disasters beget fraud victimization?: Unrealized coping through labor migration among the poor," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2013-002, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child development; natural disaster; wealth shock;

    JEL classification:

    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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