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Efficiency in a search and matching economy with a competitive informal sector

Author

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  • Charlot, Olivier
  • Malherbet, Franck
  • Ulus, Mustafa

Abstract

We consider a dual labor market with a frictional formal sector and a competitive informal sector. We show that the size of the informal sector is generally too large compared to the optimal allocation of the workers. It follows that our results give a rationale to informality-reducing policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Charlot, Olivier & Malherbet, Franck & Ulus, Mustafa, 2013. "Efficiency in a search and matching economy with a competitive informal sector," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(1), pages 192-194.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:118:y:2013:i:1:p:192-194
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2012.10.017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fields, Gary S., 2011. "Labor market analysis for developing countries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(S1), pages 16-22.
    2. Albrecht, James & Navarro, Lucas & Vroman, Susan, 2010. "Efficiency in a search and matching model with endogenous participation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 48-50, January.
    3. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, March.
    4. Arthur J. Hosios, 1990. "On The Efficiency of Matching and Related Models of Search and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(2), pages 279-298.
    5. Acemoglu, Daron, 2001. "Good Jobs versus Bad Jobs," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 1-21, January.
    6. Zenou, Yves, 2008. "Job search and mobility in developing countries. Theory and policy implications," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 336-355, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francois Langot & Shaimaa Yassin, 2016. "Informality, Public Employment and Employment Protection in Developing Countries," IRENE Working Papers 16-09, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    2. Flórez, Luz A., 2017. "Informal sector under saving: A positive analysis of labour market policies," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 13-26.
    3. Luz Adriana Flórez, 2014. "The Efficiency of the Informal Sector on the Search and Matching Framework," Borradores de Economia 832, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    4. Benoît Julien & Sephorah Mangin, 2016. "Efficiency in Search and Matching Models: A Generalized Hosios Condition," Monash Economics Working Papers 28-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    5. Julien, Benoît & Mangin, Sephorah, 2017. "Efficiency of job creation in a search and matching model with labor force participation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 149-151.
    6. Ghate, Chetan & Mazumder, Debojyoti, 2018. "Employment Targeting in a Frictional Labor Market," MPRA Paper 87065, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. repec:eee:jcecon:v:46:y:2018:i:1:p:326-348 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Gonzalez-Rozada, Martin & Ruffo, Hernán, 2016. "Optimal unemployment benefits in the presence of informal labor markets," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 204-227.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Search and matching models; Informality; Efficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E26 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Informal Economy; Underground Economy
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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