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Informality, Public Employment and Employment Protection in Developing Countries

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  • Francois Langot
  • Shaimaa Yassin

Abstract

This paper proposes an equilibrium matching labor market model for developing countries where the interaction between public, formal and informal sectors is considered. Theoretical analysis shows that labor markets' liberalization reforms can be evicted by shifts in public employment. Since the public sector accounts for a substantial share of employment in developing countries, this approach is crucial to understand their labor market outcomes. Wage offers to public sector employees increase the outside option value of workers during their bargaining processes in the formal and informal sectors. It becomes more profitable for workers to search on-the-job to access more attractive and stable jobs. The public sector therefore acts as an additional tax imposed on private firms. Using workers flows data from Egypt, we show that labor markets' liberalization plays against informal employment by increasing formal jobs' profitability, but is evicted by the increase of public sector wages observed at the same time.

Suggested Citation

  • Francois Langot & Shaimaa Yassin, 2016. "Informality, Public Employment and Employment Protection in Developing Countries," IRENE Working Papers 16-09, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:irn:wpaper:16-09
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Albrecht & Lucas Navarro & Susan Vroman, 2009. "The Effects of Labour Market Policies in an Economy with an Informal Sector," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(539), pages 1105-1129, July.
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    5. Christopher A. Pissarides & Barbara Petrongolo, 2001. "Looking into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 390-431, June.
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    9. François Langot & Shaimaa Yassin, 2015. "Reforming Employment Protection in Egypt: An Evaluation Based on Transition Models with Measurement Errors," Working Papers 918, Economic Research Forum, revised Jun 2015.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job search; Informality; Public Sector; Egypt; Unemployment; Wages; Policy Interventions.;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E26 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Informal Economy; Underground Economy
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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