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Employment Targeting in a Frictional Labor Market

Author

Listed:
  • Ghate, Chetan
  • Mazumder, Debojyoti

Abstract

Governments in both developing and developed economies play an active role in labor markets in the form of providing both formal public sector jobs and employment through public workfare programs. We refer to this as employment targeting. In the context of a simple search and matching friction model, we show that the propensity for the public sector to target more employment can increase the unemployment rate in the economy and lead to an increase in the size of the informal sector. Employment targeting can therefore have perverse effects on labor market outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Ghate, Chetan & Mazumder, Debojyoti, 2018. "Employment Targeting in a Frictional Labor Market," MPRA Paper 87065, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:87065
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/87065/1/MPRA_paper_87065.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Basu, Arnab K. & Chau, Nancy H. & Kanbur, Ravi, 2009. "A theory of employment guarantees: Contestability, credibility and distributional concerns," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(3-4), pages 482-497, April.
    2. James Albrecht & Lucas Navarro & Susan Vroman, 2009. "The Effects of Labour Market Policies in an Economy with an Informal Sector," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(539), pages 1105-1129, July.
    3. Charlot, Olivier & Malherbet, Franck & Ulus, Mustafa, 2013. "Efficiency in a search and matching economy with a competitive informal sector," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(1), pages 192-194.
    4. Pontus Rendahl, 2016. "Fiscal Policy in an Unemployment Crisis," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 83(3), pages 1189-1224.
    5. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, March.
    6. Maarek, Paul, 2012. "Labor share, informal sector and development," MPRA Paper 38756, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Pedro Gomes, 2015. "Optimal Public Sector Wages," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(587), pages 1425-1451, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Search and Matching Frictions; Labor Markets; Employment; Informal Sector; Public Sector.;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • J46 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Informal Labor Market
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • O20 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - General

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