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Drivers of industrial and non-industrial greenhouse gas emissions

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  • Sanchez, Luis F.
  • Stern, David I.

Abstract

Though there has been extensive analysis of the drivers of aggregate carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production, there has been much less analysis of the drivers of greenhouse gases in general and especially of aggregate emissions of greenhouse gases from agriculture, forestry, and other land uses, which we call non-industrial emissions in this paper. We statistically analyze the relationship between both industrial and non-industrial greenhouse gas emissions and economic growth and other potential drivers for 129 countries over the period from 1971 to 2010. Our analysis combines the three main approaches in the literature into a single framework for investigating the evolution of emissions and income. We find that economic growth is a driver of both industrial and non-industrial emissions, though economic growth has twice the effect on industrial emissions. The time effect is negative for both sources of emissions, though this effect is larger for non-industrial emissions. There is also convergence in emissions intensity for both types of emissions but given these other effects there is no evidence for an environmental Kuznets curve.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanchez, Luis F. & Stern, David I., 2016. "Drivers of industrial and non-industrial greenhouse gas emissions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 17-24.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:124:y:2016:i:c:p:17-24
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2016.01.008
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Mid-Year Update
      by noreply@blogger.com (David Stern) in Stochastic Trend on 2016-06-01 08:40:00
    2. Annual Review 2016
      by noreply@blogger.com (David Stern) in Stochastic Trend on 2016-12-26 17:08:00

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    Cited by:

    1. David I. Stern & Jeremy Dijk, 2017. "Economic growth and global particulate pollution concentrations," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 142(3), pages 391-406, June.
    2. David I. Stern & Donglan Zha, 2016. "Economic growth and particulate pollution concentrations in China," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 18(3), pages 327-338, July.
    3. Yang, Xue & Wang, Shaojian & Zhang, Wenzhong & Li, Jiaming & Zou, Yafeng, 2016. "Impacts of energy consumption, energy structure, and treatment technology on SO2 emissions: A multi-scale LMDI decomposition analysis in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 714-726.
    4. repec:kap:jbioec:v:19:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10818-017-9243-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:rensus:v:81:y:2018:i:p2:p:3120-3130 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Zhen, Wei & Qin, Quande & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2017. "Spatio-temporal patterns of energy consumption-related GHG emissions in China's crop production systems," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 274-284.
    7. David I. Stern, 2017. "The environmental Kuznets curve after 25 years," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 7-28, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Greenhouse gas emissions; Economic growth; Decoupling; Pollution; Environmental Kuznets curve; Convergence;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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