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Global energy use: Decoupling or convergence?

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  • Csereklyei, Zsuzsanna
  • Stern, David I.

Abstract

We examine the key factors driving change in energy use globally over the past four decades. We test for both strong decoupling where economic growth has less effect on energy use as income increases, and weak decoupling where energy use declines overtime in richer countries, ceteris paribus. Our econometric approach is robust to the presence of unit roots, unobserved time effects, and spatial effects. Our key findings are that the growth of per capita energy use has been primarily driven by economic growth, convergence in energy intensity, and weak decoupling. There is no sign of strong decoupling.

Suggested Citation

  • Csereklyei, Zsuzsanna & Stern, David I., 2015. "Global energy use: Decoupling or convergence?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 633-641.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:51:y:2015:i:c:p:633-641
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2015.08.029
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    Cited by:

    1. David I. Stern & Jeremy Dijk, 2017. "Economic growth and global particulate pollution concentrations," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 142(3), pages 391-406, June.
    2. repec:gam:jeners:v:11:y:2018:i:7:p:1746-:d:156010 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:gam:jeners:v:11:y:2018:i:5:p:1299-:d:147971 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:eneeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:228-239 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Payne, James E. & Vizek, Maruška & Lee, Junsoo, 2017. "Stochastic convergence in per capita fossil fuel consumption in U.S. states," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 382-395.
    6. Burke, Paul J. & Csereklyei, Zsuzsanna, 2016. "Understanding the energy-GDP elasticity: A sectoral approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 199-210.
    7. Sanchez, Luis F. & Stern, David I., 2016. "Drivers of industrial and non-industrial greenhouse gas emissions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 17-24.
    8. Mohammadi, Hassan & Ram, Rati, 2017. "Convergence in energy consumption per capita across the US states, 1970–2013: An exploration through selected parametric and non-parametric methods," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 404-410.
    9. repec:spr:endesu:v:20:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10668-016-9878-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Payne, James E. & Vizek, Maruška & Lee, Junsoo, 2017. "Is there convergence in per capita renewable energy consumption across U.S. States? Evidence from LM and RALS-LM unit root tests with breaks," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 715-728.
    11. repec:eee:energy:v:151:y:2018:i:c:p:455-466 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Mutanga, Shingirirai Savious & Quitzow, Rainer & Steckel, Jan Christoph, 2018. "Improving quality of life through sustainable energy and urban infrastructure in Africa," Economics Discussion Papers 2018-15, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    13. Csereklyei, Zsuzsanna & Thurner, Paul W. & Langer, Johannes & Küchenhoff, Helmut, 2017. "Energy paths in the European Union: A model-based clustering approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 442-457.
    14. Paul E. Brockway & Harry Saunders & Matthew K. Heun & Timothy J. Foxon & Julia K. Steinberger & John R. Barrett & Steve Sorrell, 2017. "Energy Rebound as a Potential Threat to a Low-Carbon Future: Findings from a New Exergy-Based National-Level Rebound Approach," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(1), pages 1-24, January.
    15. repec:spr:climat:v:143:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10584-017-2003-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:eee:energy:v:154:y:2018:i:c:p:544-552 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Wesley Burnett, J. & Madariaga, Jessica, 2017. "The convergence of U.S. state-level energy intensity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 357-370.
    18. David I. Stern, 2017. "How accurate are energy intensity projections?," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 143(3), pages 537-545, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy consumption; Convergence; Decoupling;

    JEL classification:

    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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