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The Relationship between Unemployment Benefits and Re-employment Probabilities: Evidence from Spain

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  • Stephen P. Jenkins
  • Carlos GarcÌa-Serrano

Abstract

We provide the first Spanish evidence about the effects on re-employment probabilities of variations in benefit levels and time-to-exhaustion. Increases in unemployment insurance (UI) benefit levels had a small disincentive effect on the re-employment hazard on average. Around this average, there were larger disincentive effects for men with elapsed durations between 4 and 18 months, whereas for men unemployed longer than 18 months, or for men resident in the south, the effect was negligible. Re-employment hazards increased when UI exhaustion was imminent, but the change was small. Extensions to unemployment assistance eligibility in 1989 for men aged 45+ years lowered re-employment probabilities. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen P. Jenkins & Carlos GarcÌa-Serrano, 2004. "The Relationship between Unemployment Benefits and Re-employment Probabilities: Evidence from Spain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(2), pages 239-260, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:66:y:2004:i:2:p:239-260
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    Cited by:

    1. Shively, Thomas S. & Walker, Stephen G. & Damien, Paul, 2011. "Nonparametric function estimation subject to monotonicity, convexity and other shape constraints," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 161(2), pages 166-181, April.
    2. Ana Iturriza & Arjun S. Bedi & Robert Sparrow, 2011. "Unemployment Assistance and Transition to Employment in Argentina," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(4), pages 811-837.
    3. repec:spr:empeco:v:54:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s00181-017-1236-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Rainer, Helmut & Siedler, Thomas, 2008. "Social networks in determining migration and labour market outcomes: evidence from the German reunification," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-36, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Alfonso Alba & Jose Maria Arranz & Fernando Muñoz-Bullón, 2012. "Re-employment probabilities of unemployment benefit recipients," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(28), pages 3645-3664, October.
    6. Roed, Knut & Zhang, Tao, 2005. "Unemployment duration and economic incentives--a quasi random-assignment approach," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(7), pages 1799-1825, October.
    7. JOSE Ma ARRANZ & Juan Muro, 2004. "Recurrent unemployment, welfare benefits and heterogeneity," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 423-441.
    8. Michael Kind, 2015. "A Level Playing Field: An Optimal Weighting Scheme of Dismissal Protection Characteristics," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(1), pages 79-99, March.
    9. Catalina Jordi & Miguel Manjón, 2014. "The determinants of urban (un)employment duration: evidence from Barcelona," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 53(2), pages 515-556, September.
    10. Tue Gorgens & Dean Hyslop, 2016. "The specification of dynamic discrete-time two-state panel data models," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2016-631, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    11. Alba-Ramirez, Alfonso & Arranz, Jose M. & Munoz-Bullon, Fernando, 2007. "Exits from unemployment: Recall or new job," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 788-810, October.
    12. José María Arranz & Carlos García- Serrano, 2004. "The influence of previous labour market experiences on subsequent job tenure," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 168(1), pages 47-68, march.
    13. Vera Brenčič, 2010. "Do Employers Respond to the Costs of Continued Search?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(2), pages 221-245, April.
    14. Nagore García, Amparo & van Soest, Arthur, 2014. "Unemployment Transitions to Stable and Unstable Jobs Before and During the Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 8121, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2009. "The role of social networks in determining migration and labour market outcomes," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 17(4), pages 739-767, October.
    16. José María Arranz & Carlos García Serrano, 2015. "Los sistemas de prestaciones por desempleo de “experience rating”. Un análisis de los despidos temporales y los subsidios cruzados en España," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 212(1), pages 129-168, March.
    17. Sergi Jiménez Martín & Judit Vall Castello, 2009. "Business Cycle Effects on Labour Force Transitions for Older People in Spain," Working Papers 2009-25, FEDEA.
    18. Alba, Alfonso & Arranz, José M. & Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando, 2006. "Unemployment duration, unemployment benefits and recalls," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb066218, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
    19. Virve Ollikainen & Tomi Kyyrä, 2006. "To Search or Not to Search? The Effects of UI Benefit Extension for the Elderly Unemployed," Discussion Papers 400, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).

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