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The role of social networks in determining migration and labour market outcomes

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  • Helmut Rainer
  • Thomas Siedler

Abstract

This paper empirically examines social network explanations for migration decisions in the context of German reunification. Using longitudinal data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, we first show that the presence of a family in West Germany is an important predictor for the migration hazard rate of East Germans. We then explore whether pre-migration networks have a discernible impact on the economic and social assimilation of East German immigrants in West Germany. We find that East German immigrants are more likely to be employed and to hold higher paying jobs when socially connected to the West prior to emigrating. Copyright (c) 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2009 The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Suggested Citation

  • Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2009. "The role of social networks in determining migration and labour market outcomes," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 17(4), pages 739-767, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:17:y:2009:i:4:p:739-767
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Giorgio Brunello & Elena Crivellaro & Lorenzo Rocco, 2012. "Lost in transition?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(4), pages 637-676, October.
    2. Bönisch, Peter & Schneider, Lutz, 2010. "Why are East Germans not More Mobile? Analyzing the Impact of Social Ties on Regional Migration," IWH Discussion Papers 16/2010, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    3. Caliendo, Marco & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Hennecke, Juliane & Uhlendorff, Arne, 2015. "Job Search, Locus of Control, and Internal Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 9600, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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