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Lost in transition?

Author

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  • Giorgio Brunello
  • Elena Crivellaro
  • Lorenzo Rocco

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Giorgio Brunello & Elena Crivellaro & Lorenzo Rocco, 2012. "Lost in transition?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(4), pages 637-676, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:20:y:2012:i:4:p:637-676
    DOI: j.1468-0351.2012.00442.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel Münich & Jan Svejnar & Katherine Terrell, 2005. "Returns to Human Capital Under The Communist Wage Grid and During the Transition to a Market Economy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 100-123, February.
    2. World Bank, 2002. "Transition, The First Ten Years : Analysis and Lessons for Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14042, January.
    3. Kevin Denny & Orla Doyle, 2010. "Returns to basic skills in central and eastern Europe," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(1), pages 183-208, January.
    4. Card, David & Rothstein, Jesse, 2007. "Racial segregation and the black-white test score gap," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(11-12), pages 2158-2184, December.
    5. Stepan Jurajda, 2003. "Does the Short Supply of College Education Bite?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp213, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    6. Lawrence F. Katz & Kevin M. Murphy, 1992. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963–1987: Supply and Demand Factors," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 35-78.
    7. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 2001. "Can Falling Supply Explain the Rising Return to College for Younger Men? A Cohort-Based Analysis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 705-746.
    8. John Micklewright, 1999. "Education, inequality and transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(2), pages 343-376, July.
    9. Lamo, Ana & Messina, Julián & Wasmer, Etienne, 2011. "Are specific skills an obstacle to labor market adjustment?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 240-256, April.
    10. Flabbi, Luca & Paternostro, Stefano & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2008. "Returns to education in the economic transition: A systematic assessment using comparable data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 724-740, December.
    11. Jante Parlevliet & Theodora Xenogiani, 2008. "Report on Informal Employment in Romania," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 271, OECD Publishing.
    12. Robert Orlowski & Regina T. Riphahn, 2009. "The East German wage structure after transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 17(4), pages 629-659, October.
    13. Andren, Daniela & Earle, John S. & Sapatoru, Dana, 2005. "The wage effects of schooling under socialism and in transition: Evidence from Romania, 1950-2000," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 300-323, June.
    14. Tito Boeri & Katherine Terrell, 2002. "Institutional Determinants of Labor Reallocation in Transition," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 51-76, Winter.
    15. Fleisher, Belton M. & Sabirianova, Klara & Wang, Xiaojun, 2005. "Returns to skills and the speed of reforms: Evidence from Central and Eastern Europe, China, and Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 351-370, June.
    16. Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2009. "The role of social networks in determining migration and labour market outcomes," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 17(4), pages 739-767, October.
    17. Jennifer Hunt, 2006. "Staunching Emigration from East Germany: Age and the Determinants of Migration," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(5), pages 1014-1037, September.
    18. Acemoglu, Daron & Autor, David, 2011. "Skills, Tasks and Technologies: Implications for Employment and Earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    19. Card, David, 1999. "The causal effect of education on earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1801-1863 Elsevier.
    20. Flanagan, Robert J., 1998. "Were communists good human capitalists? The case of the Czech Republic," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 295-312, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Elsner, Benjamin, 2013. "Emigration and wages: The EU enlargement experiment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 154-163.
    2. repec:oup:jecgeo:v:17:y:2017:i:5:p:1111-1148. is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Zsolt Spéder & Tamás Bartus, 2017. "Educational Enrolment, Double-Status Positions and the Transition to Motherhood in Hungary," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 55-85, February.
    4. Amini, Chiara & Commander, Simon, 2012. "Educational scores: How does Russia fare?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 508-527.
    5. Oliver Falck & Robert Gold & Stephan Heblich, 2017. "Lifting the iron curtain: school-age education and entrepreneurial intentions," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(5), pages 1111-1148.

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