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Can the composition of the family during adolescence influence their future unemployment situation? Evidence for Spain

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  • Morales, Marina

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyze whether the composition of the household during adolescence may be an important determinant of their future unemployment in Spain. To address this issue, we follow the Quantity-Quality model of Becker-Lewis (Becker and Lewis, 1973), using data from the Survey of Living Conditions (2011). Results show that individuals living with both parents at home during their teenage years are less likely to be unemployed in the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Morales, Marina, 2018. "Can the composition of the family during adolescence influence their future unemployment situation? Evidence for Spain," MPRA Paper 86770, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:86770
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/87933/1/MPRA_paper_87933.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Blanchard, Olivier & Jimeno, Juan F, 1995. "Structural Unemployment: Spain versus Portugal," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 212-218, May.
    2. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 279-288, Part II, .
    3. Kooreman, Peter & Ridder, Geert, 1983. "The effects of age and unemployment percentage on the duration of unemployment: Evidence from aggregate data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(1-3), pages 41-57, January.
    4. Ghazala Azmat & Maia Güell & Alan Manning, 2006. "Gender Gaps in Unemployment Rates in OECD Countries," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(1), pages 1-38, January.
    5. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina, 2014. "Regional unemployment, gender, and time allocation of the unemployed," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 105-127, March.
    6. Stephen P. Jenkins & Carlos GarcÌa-Serrano, 2004. "The Relationship between Unemployment Benefits and Re-employment Probabilities: Evidence from Spain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(2), pages 239-260, May.
    7. Riddell, W. Craig & Song, Xueda, 2011. "The impact of education on unemployment incidence and re-employment success: Evidence from the U.S. labour market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 453-463, August.
    8. Baccaro, Lucio & Rei, Diego, 2007. "Institutional Determinants of Unemployment in OECD Countries: Does the Deregulatory View Hold Water?," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 61(03), pages 527-569, July.
    9. José Molina, 2015. "Caring within the Family: Reconciling Work and Family Life," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 1-4, March.
    10. Sandra Hofferth, 2006. "Residential father family type and child well-being: Investment versus selection," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(1), pages 53-77, February.
    11. José Molina, 2013. "Altruism in the household: in kind transfers in the context of kin selection," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 309-312, September.
    12. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina, 2013. "Parents’ education as a determinant of educational childcare time," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 719-749, April.
    13. repec:spr:empeco:v:52:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00181-016-1100-x is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household composition; Unemployment; Labor Market; Spain;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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