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Residential father family type and child well-being: Investment versus selection

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  • Sandra Hofferth

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  • Sandra Hofferth, 2006. "Residential father family type and child well-being: Investment versus selection," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(1), pages 53-77, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:43:y:2006:i:1:p:53-77
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2006.0006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Fitzgerald & Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1998. "An Analysis of Sample Attrition in Panel Data: The Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 251-299.
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