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Just-In-Time Production, Work Organization And Absence Control




Studies of sick-pay and absenteeism have traditionally treated absence as a worker-related phenomenon. There are good reasons to suppose, though, that firms' incentives to control absenteeism are not uniform. Using an employee/employer-matched data set, we investigate the relationship between the firm's production methods and the generosity of its sick-pay. The results suggest that firms that might be expected to value reliability highly, characterized as those that use just-in-time, are more likely to provide less generous sick-pay. Those findings survive when we control for the use of complementary policies that buffer production from absence shocks. Copyright © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and The University of Manchester.

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  • Joseph Lanfranchi & John Treble, 2010. "Just-In-Time Production, Work Organization And Absence Control," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 78(5), pages 460-483, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:78:y:2010:i:5:p:460-483

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Barmby, Tim & Stephan, Gesine, 2000. "Worker Absenteeism: Why Firm Size May Matter," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 68(5), pages 568-577, September.
    2. Barmby, T A & Orme, C D & Treble, John G, 1991. "Worker Absenteeism: An Analysis Using Microdata," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(405), pages 214-229, March.
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    6. Melvyn Coles & Joseph Lanfranchi & Ali Skalli & John Treble, 2007. "Pay, Technology, And The Cost Of Worker Absence," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(2), pages 268-285, April.
    7. John S. Heywood & Uwe Jirjahn, 2004. "Teams, Teamwork and Absence," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(4), pages 765-782, December.
    8. Tim A. Barmby & Marco G. Ercolani & John G. Treble, 2002. "Sickness Absence: An International Comparison," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 315-331, June.
    9. Ichniowski, Casey & Shaw, Kathryn & Prennushi, Giovanna, 1997. "The Effects of Human Resource Management Practices on Productivity: A Study of Steel Finishing Lines," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 291-313, June.
    10. Arne L. Kalleberg, 2001. "Organizing Flexibility: The Flexible Firm in a New Century," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 39(4), pages 479-504, December.
    11. Rick Audas & Tim Barmby & John Treble, 2004. "Luck, Effort, and Reward in an Organizational Hierarchy," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(2), pages 379-396, April.
    12. John Paul Macduffie, 1995. "Human Resource Bundles and Manufacturing Performance: Organizational Logic and Flexible Production Systems in the World Auto Industry," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(2), pages 197-221, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2012. "Does high involvement management improve worker wellbeing?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 660-680.
    2. David Marsden & Simone Moriconi, 2009. "'The Value of Rude Health': Employees' Well Being, Absence and Workplace Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0919, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Lindgren, Karl-Oskar, 2012. "Workplace size and sickness absence transitions," Working Paper Series 2012:26, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    4. M. A. Ben Halima & V. Hyafil-Solelhac & M. Koubi & C. Regaert, 2015. "The Effects of the Complementary Sickness Benefits (CSB) on Sick Leave Duration: an Approach Based on Collective Bargaining Agreements," Documents de Travail de la DESE - Working Papers of the DESE g2015-05, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, DESE.
    5. D.S. Possenriede & W.H.J. Hassink & J. Plantenga, 2014. "Does temporal and locational flexibility of work reduce absenteeism?," Working Papers 14-09, Utrecht School of Economics.
    6. David Marsden & Richard Belfield, 2010. "Institutions and the Management of Human Resources: Incentive Pay Systems in France and Great Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(2), pages 235-283, June.
    7. Petri Böckerman, 2015. "High involvement management and employee well-being," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 171-171, July.

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