IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/brjirl/v48y2010i2p460-480.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Industrial Relations Climate, Employee Voice and Managerial Attitudes to Unions: An Australian Study

Author

Listed:
  • Amanda Pyman
  • Peter Holland
  • Julian Teicher
  • Brian K. Cooper

Abstract

This article examines how employee voice arrangements and managerial attitudes to unions shape employees' perceptions of the industrial relations climate, using data from the 2007 Australian Worker Representation and Participation Survey (AWRPS) of 1,022 employees. Controlling for a range of personal, job and workplace characteristics, regression analyses demonstrate that employees' perceptions of the industrial relations climate are more likely to be favourable if they have access to direct-only voice arrangements. Where management is perceived by employees to oppose unions (in unionized workplaces), the industrial relations climate is more likely to be reported as poor. These findings have theoretical implications, and significant practical implications for employers, employees, unions and the government. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2010.

Suggested Citation

  • Amanda Pyman & Peter Holland & Julian Teicher & Brian K. Cooper, 2010. "Industrial Relations Climate, Employee Voice and Managerial Attitudes to Unions: An Australian Study," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(2), pages 460-480, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:48:y:2010:i:2:p:460-480
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2009.00772.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tove H. Hammer & Steven C. Currall & Robert N. Stern, 1991. "Worker Representation on Boards of Directors: A Study of Competing Roles," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(4), pages 661-680, July.
    2. Alex Bryson, 2001. "Union Effects On Managerial and Employee Perceptions of Employee Relations in Britain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0494, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Michael Schuster, 1983. "The Impact of Union-Management Cooperation on Productivity and Employment," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 36(3), pages 415-430, April.
    4. John Godard & John T. Delaney, 2000. "Reflections on the “High Performance†Paradigm's Implications for Industrial Relations as a Field," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(3), pages 482-502, April.
    5. Saul A. Rubinstein, 2000. "The Impact of Co-Management on Quality Performance: The Case of the Saturn Corporation," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(2), pages 197-218, January.
    6. Jacques Bélanger & Paul Edwards, 2007. "The Conditions Promoting Compromise in the Workplace," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(4), pages 713-734, December.
    7. Harry C. Katz & Thomas A. Kochan & Kenneth R. Gobeille, 1983. "Industrial Relations Performance, Economic Performance, and QWL Programs: An Interplant Analysis," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 37(1), pages 3-17, October.
    8. Anthony Dobbins & Patrick Gunnigle, 2009. "Can Voluntary Workplace Partnership Deliver Sustainable Mutual Gains?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(3), pages 546-570, September.
    9. Stephen Deery & Roderick Iverson & Peter Erwin, 1999. "Industrial Relations Climate, Attendance Behaviour and the Role of Trade Unions," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 37(4), pages 533-558, December.
    10. Alex Bryson & Rafael Gomez & Tobias Kretschmer & Paul Willman, 2007. "The diffusion of workplace voice and high-commitment human resource management practices in Britain, 1984–1998," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 395-426, June.
    11. Rae Cooper & Bradon Ellem, 2008. "The Neoliberal State, Trade Unions and Collective Bargaining in Australia," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(3), pages 532-554, September.
    12. Sue Fernie & David Metcalf, 1995. "Participation, Contingent Pay, Representation and Workplace Performance: Evidence from Great Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 33(3), pages 379-415, September.
    13. Stephen J. Deery & Roderick D. Iverson & Peter J. Erwin, 1994. "Predicting Organizational and Union Commitment: The Effect of Industrial Relations Climate," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 32(4), pages 581-597, December.
    14. William N. Cooke, 1990. "Factors Influencing the Effect of Joint Union-Management Programs on Employee-Supervisor Relations," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 43(5), pages 587-603, October.
    15. Briggs, C, 2004. "The Return of the Lockout in Australia: a Profile of Lockouts since the Decentralisation of Bargaining," Australian Bulletin of Labour, National Institute of Labour Studies, vol. 30(2), pages 101-112.
    16. William N. Cooke, 1992. "Product Quality Improvement through Employee Participation: The Effects of Unionization and Joint Union-Management Administration," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(1), pages 119-134, October.
    17. Peter Boxall & Peter Haynes, 1997. "Strategy and Trade Union Effectiveness in a Neo-liberal Environment," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 35(4), pages 567-591, December.
    18. Peter Holland & Lindsay Nelson & Cathy Fisher, 2000. "Australian Trade Unions' Responses to Human Resource Management Initiatives in a Globalized Era," Asia Pacific Business Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 46-70, September.
    19. Milton Derber & W. Ellison Chalmers & Ross Stagner, 1958. "Environmental Variables and Union-Management Accommodation," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 11(3), pages 413-428, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bruce Kaufman, 2014. "Explaining Breadth and Depth of Employee Voice across Firms: A Voice Factor Demand Model," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 296-319, September.
    2. Nicole Torka & Jan Kees Looise & Stefan Zagelmeyer, 2011. "Ordinary Atypical Workers, Participation within the Firm and Innovation: A Theoretical Endeavor and Empirical Outlook," management revue. Socio-economic Studies, Rainer Hampp Verlag, vol. 22(3), pages 221-239.
    3. Aurora Trif & Malcolm Brady, 2013. "Implications of game theory for theoretical underpinning of cooperative relations in workplace partnership," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(3), pages 258-275, May.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:48:y:2010:i:2:p:460-480. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/lsepsuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.