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Is Pupil Attainment Higher in Well-managed Schools?

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Listed:
  • Alex Bryson

    () (University College London, National Institute of Social and Economic Research and Institute for the Study of Labor)

  • Lucy Stokes

    (National Institute of Social and Economic Research and Institute for the Study of Labor)

  • David Wilkinson

    (University College London and National Institute of Social and Economic Research and Institute for the Study of Labor)

Abstract

Linking the Workplace Employment Relations Surveys 2004 and 2011 to administrative data on pupil attainment in England we examine whether secondary and primary schools who deploy more intensive human resource management (HRM) practices have higher pupil attainment. We find intensive use of HRM practices is positively and significantly correlated with higher labour productivity and quality of provision, and with better financial performance, most notably in primary schools, but it is not associated with higher pupil attainment as indicated by assessment scores at Key Stage 2, Key Stage 4 and value-added measures based on assessments at these points.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Bryson & Lucy Stokes & David Wilkinson, 2018. "Is Pupil Attainment Higher in Well-managed Schools?," DoQSS Working Papers 18-09, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1809
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    school performance; pupil attainment; value-added; human resource management;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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