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The diffusion of workplace voice and high-commitment human resource management practices in Britain, 1984–1998

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  • Alex Bryson
  • Rafael Gomez
  • Tobias Kretschmer
  • Paul Willman

Abstract

Workplace voice and systems of high-commitment human resource management (HCHRM) have been found to impart measurable benefits to adopting firms, yet significant numbers of establishments fail to employ such practices. This article addresses the puzzle of staggered diffusion by explicitly treating voice and HCHRM as technological innovations. Using British data, the article finds that variables highlighted in the technological diffusion literature are significant predictors of workplace voice and HCHRM adoption. Specifically, we find that (i) number of employees, (ii) size of multi-establishment network, (iii) ownership type, (iv) set-up date and (v) network effects all play a significant role in predicting where voice and HCHRM are found. We also find evidence of joint usage of workplace voice and HCHRM practices, suggesting that HCHRM is not a substitute or natural successor to voice. Copyright 2007 , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Bryson & Rafael Gomez & Tobias Kretschmer & Paul Willman, 2007. "The diffusion of workplace voice and high-commitment human resource management practices in Britain, 1984–1998," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 395-426, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:16:y:2007:i:3:p:395-426
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/icc/dtm009
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    1. repec:eme:aeapzz:s0885-333920140000015009 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Chikako Oka, 2016. "Improving Working Conditions in Garment Supply Chains: The Role of Unions in Cambodia," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 54(3), pages 647-672, September.
    3. Alex Bryson & John Forth & Minghai Zhou, 2014. "CEO Incentive Contracts in China: Why Does City Location Matter?," Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory & Labor-Managed Firms,in: International Perspectives on Participation, volume 15, pages 25-49 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    4. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2012. "Does high involvement management improve worker wellbeing?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 660-680.
    5. Alex Bryson & Paul Willman & Rafael Gomez & Tobias Kretschmer, 2013. "The Comparative Advantage of Non-Union Voice in B ritain, 1980–2004," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52, pages 194-220, January.
    6. John S. Heywood & Laurie A. Miller, 2015. "Schedule Flexibility, Family Friendly Policies and Absence," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(6), pages 652-675, December.
    7. Petri Böckerman & Alex Bryson & Pekka Ilmakunnas, 2013. "Does high involvement management lead to higher pay?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 176(4), pages 861-885, October.
    8. Amanda Pyman & Peter Holland & Julian Teicher & Brian K. Cooper, 2010. "Industrial Relations Climate, Employee Voice and Managerial Attitudes to Unions: An Australian Study," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(2), pages 460-480, June.
    9. Alex Bryson & Stephen J Wood, 2008. "The Rise of High Involvement Management in Britain," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 321, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    10. Sergio Salis & Allan M. Williams, 2010. "Knowledge Sharing through Face-to-Face Communication and Labour Productivity: Evidence from British Workplaces," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(2), pages 436-459, June.
    11. Chai, D.H., 2010. "Foreign Corporate Ownership and Dividends," Working Papers wp401, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    12. Yamamoto Isamu & Matsuura Toshiyuki, 2014. "Effect of Work–Life Balance Practices on Firm Productivity: Evidence from Japanese Firm-Level Panel Data," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(4), pages 1-32, October.

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