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Increased Purchases of Locally Grown Ethnic Greens and Herbs due to Concerns about Food Miles

Author

Listed:
  • Govindasamy, Ramu
  • Puduri, Venkata
  • Kelley, Kathleen
  • Simon, James E.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to highlight locally grown ethnic greens and herbs purchases due to concern about food miles and associated impact on purchasing these greens and herbs. A telephone survey was conducted in 16 East Coast states and Washington D.C., May through October of 2010, to document ethnic consumers’ behavior and demand for greens and herbs traditionally used in cuisine, important to their cultures. Data collected can be used to assist small and medium-sized farmers with better understanding consumer perceptions and factors that drive ethnic greens and herbs markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Govindasamy, Ramu & Puduri, Venkata & Kelley, Kathleen & Simon, James E., 2012. "Increased Purchases of Locally Grown Ethnic Greens and Herbs due to Concerns about Food Miles," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 43(3), November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlofdr:158991
    as

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/158991
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jekanowski, Mark D. & Williams, Daniel R. & Schiek, William A., 2000. "Consumers’ Willingness to Purchase Locally Produced Agricultural Products: An Analysis of an Indiana Survey," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(01), pages 43-53, April.
    2. Eastwood, David B. & Brooker, John R. & Gray, Morgan D., 1999. "Location And Other Market Attributes Affecting Farmer'S Market Patronage: The Case Of Tennessee," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 30(1), March.
    3. Paul M. Patterson & Hans Olofsson & Timothy J. Richards & Sharon Sass, 1999. "An empirical analysis of state agricultural product promotions: A case study on Arizona Grown," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(2), pages 179-196.
    4. Sigrid Stagl, 2002. "Local Organic Food Markets: Potentials and Limitations for Contributing to Sustainable Development," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 145-162, June.
    5. Brooker, John R. & Eastwood, David B., 1989. "Using State Logos To Increase Purchases Of Selected Food Products," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 20(1), February.
    6. Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr., 1995. "Determinants Of U.S. Household Expenditures On Fruit And Vegetables: A Note And Update," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 27(02), December.
    7. Gill Seyfang, 2004. "Consuming Values and Contested Cultures: A Critical Analysis of the UK Strategy for Sustainable Consumption and Production," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 62(3), pages 323-338.
    8. Jekanowski, Mark D. & Williams, Daniel R., II & Schiek, William A., 2000. "Consumers' Willingness To Purchase Locally Produced Agricultural Products: An Analysis Of An Indiana Survey," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 29(1), April.
    9. Govindasamy, Ramu & Nemana, Aparna & Puduri, Venkata S. & Pappas, Kim, 2006. "Ethnic Produce Marketing in the Mid-Atlantic States: Consumer Shopping Patterns and Willingness-to-Pay Analysis," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 21(4).
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