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Disclosure by Politicians

  • Simeon Djankov
  • Rafael La Porta
  • Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes
  • Andrei Shleifer

We collect data on the rules and practices of financial and conflict disclosure by members of Parliament in 175 countries. Although two-thirds of the countries have some disclosure laws, less than one-third make disclosures available to the public, and less than one-sixth of potentially useful information is publicly available in practice, on average. Countries that are richer, more democratic, and have free press have more disclosure. Public disclosure, but not internal disclosure to parliament, is positively related to government quality, including lower corruption. (JEL J13, I21, I12)

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/app.2.2.179
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Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Journal: Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 2 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 179-209

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aejapp:v:2:y:2010:i:2:p:179-209
Note: DOI: 10.1257/app.2.2.179
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://www.aeaweb.org/aej-applied
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