IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login

Citations for "Brother Correlations in Earnings in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden Compared to the United States"

by Björklund, Anders & Eriksson, Tor & Jäntti, Markus & Raaum, Oddbjørn & Österbacka, Eva

For a complete description of this item, click here. For a RSS feed for citations of this item, click here.
as in new window

  1. Björklund, Anders, 2006. "Family Background and Outcomes Later in Life: A (Partial and Personal) Survey of Recent Research Using Swedish Register Data," Working Paper Series 4/2007, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  2. Paul J. Devereux & Sandra E. Black & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2003. "Why the apple doesn't fall far : understanding intergenerational transmission of human capital," Open Access publications 10197/750, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  3. Arnaud Lefranc & Fumiaki Ojima & Takashi Yoshida, 2011. "Intergenerational earnings mobility in Japan among sons and daughters : levels and trends," THEMA Working Papers 2011-10, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  4. Løken, Katrine V., 2010. "Family income and children's education: Using the Norwegian oil boom as a natural experiment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 118-129, January.
  5. Jäntti, Markus & Bratsberg,Bernt & Røed, Knut & Raaum, Oddbjørn & Naylor, Robin & Österbacka, Eva & Björklund, Anders & Eriksson, Tor, 2007. "American exceptionalism in a new light : a comparison of intergenerational earnings mobility in the Nordic countries, the United Kingdom and the United States," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 781, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  6. Anger, Silke & Schnitzlein, Daniel D., 2013. "Like Brother, Like Sister? The Importance of Family Background for Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80052, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  7. Nathan D. Grawe & Casey B. Mulligan, 2002. "Economic Interpretations of Intergenerational Correlations," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 45-58, Summer.
  8. Hirvonen, Lalaina, 2006. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility Among Daughters and Sons: Evidence from Sweden and a Comparison with the United States," Working Paper Series 5/2006, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  9. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J., 2010. "Recent Developments in Intergenerational Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 4866, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Schnitzlein, Daniel D., 2012. "How important is cultural background for the level of intergenerational mobility?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 114(3), pages 335-337.
  11. Hassler, John & Rodríguez Mora, José Vicente & Zeira, Joseph, 2000. "Inequality and Mobility," CEPR Discussion Papers 2497, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  12. Maia Guell & Jose V. Rodriguez Mora & Christopher I. Telmer, 2013. "Intergenerational Mobility and the Informative Content of Surnames," ESE Discussion Papers 229, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
  13. McIntosh, James & Munk, Martin D., 2009. "Social class, family background, and intergenerational mobility," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 107-117, January.
  14. Markus Jäntti & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2013. "Income Mobility," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 607, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  15. Nathalie Chusseau & Joel Hellier, 2012. "Education, Intergenerational Mobility and Inequality," Working Papers 261, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  16. Kroh, Martin & Selb, Peter, 2009. "Inheritance and the Dynamics of Party Identification," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 559-574.
  17. Björklund, Anders & Jäntti, Markus & Lindquist, Matthew J., 2009. "Family background and income during the rise of the welfare state: Brother correlations in income for Swedish men born 1932-1968," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(5-6), pages 671-680, June.
  18. Bhashkar Mazumder, 2004. "Sibling similarities, differences and economic inequality," Working Paper Series WP-04-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  19. Samuel Bowles & Herbert Gintis, 2001. "The Inheritance of Economic Status: Education, Class, and Genetics," Working Papers 01-01-005, Santa Fe Institute.
  20. Lindahl, Lena, 2002. "Do birth order and family size matter for intergenerational income mobility? Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 5/2002, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  21. Björklund, Anders & Bratsberg, Bernt & Eriksson, Tor & Jäntti, Markus & Raaum, Oddbjørn, 2004. "Inter-Industry Wage Differentials and Unobserved Ability: Siblings Evidence from Five Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 1080, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  22. Eriksson, Tor & Bratsberg, Bernt & Raaum, Oddbjørn, 2005. "Earnings persistence across generations: Transmission through health?," Memorandum 35/2005, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  23. Lena Lindahl, 2011. "A comparison of family and neighborhood effects on grades, test scores, educational attainment and income—evidence from Sweden," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 207-226, June.
  24. Michael Beenstock, 2008. "Deconstructing the Sibling Correlation: How Families Increase Inequality," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 325-345, September.
  25. Fochesato, Mattia & Bowles, Samuel, 2015. "Nordic exceptionalism? Social democratic egalitarianism in world-historic perspective," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 30-44.
  26. Björklund, Anders & Lindahl, Lena & Lindquist, Matthew J., 2008. "What More Than Parental Income? An Exploration of What Swedish Siblings Get from Their Parents," IZA Discussion Papers 3735, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  27. Dalton Conley & Rebecca Glauber, 2005. "Sibling Similarity and Difference in Socioeconomic Status: Life Course and Family Resource Effects," NBER Working Papers 11320, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  28. Ann Huff Stevens & Marianne Page & Philip Oreopoulos, 2005. "The Intergenerational Effects of Compulsory Schooling," Working Papers 519, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  29. Nicoletti, Cheti & Rabe, Birgitta, 2014. "Sibling Spillover Effects in School Achievement," IZA Discussion Papers 8615, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  30. Chen, Natalie & Conconi, Paola & Perroni, Carlo, 2011. "Multi-Trait Matching and Intergenerational Mobility: A Cinderella Story," CEPR Discussion Papers 8605, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  31. Björklund, Anders & Jäntti, Markus, 2012. "How important is family background for labor-economic outcomes?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 465-474.
  32. David I. Levine & Bhashkar Mazumder, 2003. "The growing importance of family and community: an analysis of changes in the sibling correlation in earnings," Working Paper Series WP-03-24, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  33. Daniel D. Schnitzlein, 2011. "How Important Is the Family?: Evidence from Sibling Correlations in Permanent Earnings in the US, Germany and Denmark," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 365, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  34. Nilsson, William, 2005. "Equality of Opportunity, Heterogeneity and Poverty," Umeå Economic Studies 652, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
  35. Rainer Winkelmann, 2002. "Subjective Well-Being and the Family: Results from an Ordered Probit Model with Multiple Random Effects," SOI - Working Papers 0204, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich, revised Jan 2004.
  36. Ryo Arawatari & Tetsuo Ono, 2007. "Dynamic Political Economy of Redistribution Policy: The Role of Education Costs," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 07-31-Rev, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Nov 2007.
  37. Werner, Arndt & Moog, Petra, 2009. "Why do Employees Leave Their Jobs for Self-Employment? – The Impact of Entrepreneurial Working Conditions in Small Firms," MPRA Paper 18826, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  38. Päivi Mattila-Wiro, 2006. "Changes in the Distribution of Economic Wellbeing in Finland," Research Reports 128, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
  39. Anders Björklund & Richard B. Freeman, 2010. "Searching for Optimal Inequality/Incentives," NBER Chapters, in: Reforming the Welfare State: Recovery and Beyond in Sweden, pages 25-56 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  40. Gustavo A. Marrero & Juan G. Rodriguez, 2012. "Macroeconomic determinants of inequality of opportunity and effort in the US: 1970-2009," Working Papers 249, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  41. Kaye K. W. Lee, 2006. "Personality and Earnings," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_443, Levy Economics Institute.
  42. Björklund, Anders & Sundström, Marianne, 2002. "Parental Separation and Children's Educational Attainment: A Siblings Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 643, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  43. Bhashkar Mazumder, 2008. "Sibling similarities and economic inequality in the US," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 685-701, July.
  44. Black, Sandra & Devereux, Paul J. & Salvanes, Kjell G, 2003. "Why the Apple Doesn't Fall: Understanding Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital," CEPR Discussion Papers 4150, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  45. Szulkin, Ryszard & Jonsson, Jan O., 2007. "Ethnic Segregation and Educational Outcomes in Swedish Comprehensive Schools," SULCIS Working Papers 2007:2, Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
  46. Philip Oreopoulos & Marianne E. Page & Ann Huff Stevens, 2003. "Does Human Capital Transfer from Parent to Child? The Intergenerational Effects of Compulsory Schooling," NBER Working Papers 10164, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.