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Ethnic Segregation and Educational Outcomes in Swedish Comprehensive Schools

Author

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  • Szulkin, Ryszard

    () (Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS)

  • Jonsson, Jan O.

    () (Institutet för Social Forskning (SOFI))

Abstract

We ask whether ethnic density in Swedish comprehensive schools affect teacher-assigned school grades in ninth grade (age 16). The data, based on two entire cohorts who graduated in 1998 and 1999 (188,000 pupils and 1,043 schools), link school information with Census data on social origin, and enable us to distinguish first- from second generation immigrants. Using multilevel analysis we find the proportion of first, but not the second, generation immigrant pupils in a school to depress grades in general, but particularly for (first generation) immigrant pupils. Passing a threshold of more than 40 percent immigrants reduces grades with around a fifth of a standard deviation, affecting fourteen percent of immigrant children. Our main results are robust to model specifications which address omitted variable bias both at individual- and school-level. One policy implication of our results is that desegregation policies which concentrated on the two per cent most segregated schools would probably improve school results and reduce ethnic inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Szulkin, Ryszard & Jonsson, Jan O., 2007. "Ethnic Segregation and Educational Outcomes in Swedish Comprehensive Schools," SULCIS Working Papers 2007:2, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sulcis:2007_002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jensen, Peter & Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz, 2011. "The effect of immigrant concentration in schools on native and immigrant children's reading and math skills," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1503-1515.
    2. Frederico Gil Sander & Intan Nadia Jalil & Rabia Ali, 2013. "Malaysia Economic Monitor, December 2013 : High-Performing Education," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16705, The World Bank.
    3. repec:clp:wpaper:wp10 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Smyth, Emer & Darmody, Merike & McGinnity, Frances & Byrne, Delma, 2009. "Adapting to Diversity: Irish Schools and Newcomer Students," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS8.
    5. Mary-Anne Holfve-Sabel, 2015. "Students’ Individual Choices of Peers to Work with During Lessons May Counteract Segregation," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(2), pages 577-594, June.
    6. Seah, Kelvin, 2016. "The Impact of Immigrant Peers on Native Students' Academic Achievement in Countries Where Parents of Immigrants Are Relatively Skilled," IZA Discussion Papers 10065, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ethnic inequality; Immigrant schooling; Educational attainment; Contextual effects; Ethnic inequality; Immigrant schooling;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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