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Self-selection in the state school system

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  • Donald Robertson
  • James Symons

Abstract

With diminishing returns to the peer group, it is optimal social policy to mix children in schools. We consider what happens when, contrary to the outcome being determined by a social planner, schools and children are free to seek each other out: with some caveats, this leads to perfect segregation by child quality. It is shown that this is the worst possible outcome. We show also that a competitive system produces the optimal allocation of children to schools.

Suggested Citation

  • Donald Robertson & James Symons, 2003. "Self-selection in the state school system," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 259-272.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:11:y:2003:i:3:p:259-272 DOI: 10.1080/0964529032000148791
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    Cited by:

    1. Szulkin, Ryszard & Hällsten, Martin, 2009. "Families, neighborhoods, and the future: The transition to adulthood of children of native and immigrant origin in Sweden," SULCIS Working Papers 2009:9, Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
    2. Donald Robertson & James Symons, 2003. "Do Peer Groups Matter? Peer Group versus Schooling Effects on Academic Attainment," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, pages 31-53.
    3. Szulkin, Ryszard & Jonsson, Jan O., 2007. "Ethnic Segregation and Educational Outcomes in Swedish Comprehensive Schools," SULCIS Working Papers 2007:2, Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
    4. Bergh, Andreas & Fink, Günther, 2009. "Higher education, elite institutions and inequality," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 376-384, April.
    5. Edward P. Lazear, 1999. "Educational Production," NBER Working Papers 7349, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Neymotin, Florence, 2009. "Immigration and its effect on the college-going outcomes of natives," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 538-550, October.

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