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Immigration and its effect on the college-going outcomes of natives

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  • Neymotin, Florence

Abstract

In this paper, I analyze immigration's effect on the SAT-scores and college application patterns of high school students in California and Texas. The student-level dataset used is longitudinal in nature and is matched via a unique algorithm to the Census 2000 summary tabulation files to determine immigration at the local census-place level. The Census measure of immigration developed here is extremely specific and improves upon existing immigration measures. Using empirical strategies to account for issues of selection, this essay's main finding is that the 1990s immigration did not harm, and possibly benefited the student outcomes of U.S. citizens.

Suggested Citation

  • Neymotin, Florence, 2009. "Immigration and its effect on the college-going outcomes of natives," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 538-550, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:28:y:2009:i:5:p:538-550
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gordon H. Hanson & Raymond Robertson & Antonio Spilimbergo, 2002. "Does Border Enforcement Protect U.S. Workers From Illegal Immigration?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 73-92, February.
    2. Eric D. Gould & Victor Lavy & M. Daniele Paserman, 2009. "Does Immigration Affect the Long-Term Educational Outcomes of Natives? Quasi-Experimental Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(540), pages 1243-1269, October.
    3. Chiswick, Barry R. & DebBurman, Noyna, 2004. "Educational attainment: analysis by immigrant generation," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 361-379, August.
    4. Betts, Julian R. & Fairlie, Robert W., 2003. "Does immigration induce 'native flight' from public schools into private schools?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(5-6), pages 987-1012, May.
    5. Betts, Julian R. & Fairlie, Robert W., 2001. "Explaining Ethnic, Racial, and Immigrant Differences in Private School Attendance," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 26-51, July.
    6. George J. Borjas, 2004. "Do Foreign Students Crowd Out Native Students from Graduate Programs?," NBER Working Papers 10349, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Julian R. Betts & Magnus Lofstrom, 2000. "The Educational Attainment of Immigrants: Trends and Implications," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 51-116 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Robert Crosnoe & Lorena Lopez-Gonzalez & Chandra Muller, 2004. "Immigration from Mexico into the Math/Science Pipeline in American Education-super-," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1208-1226.
    9. T. Paul Schultz, 1998. "Immigrant quality and assimilation: A review of the US literature," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 11(2), pages 239-252.
    10. Locher, Lilo, 2004. "Immigration from the former Soviet Union to Israel: Who is coming when?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(6), pages 1243-1255, December.
    11. Donald Robertson & James Symons, 2003. "Self-selection in the state school system," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 259-272.
    12. Betts, Julian, 1998. "Educational Crowding Out: Do Immigrants Affect the Educational Attainment of American Minorities?," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt8vt7f1bh, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chin, Aimee & Daysal, N. Meltem & Imberman, Scott A., 2013. "Impact of bilingual education programs on limited English proficient students and their peers: Regression discontinuity evidence from Texas," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 63-78.
    2. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2015. "Does Immigration Affect Whether US Natives Major in Science and Engineering?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(S1), pages 79-108.
    3. Seah, Kelvin, 2016. "The Impact of Immigrant Peers on Native Students' Academic Achievement in Countries Where Parents of Immigrants Are Relatively Skilled," IZA Discussion Papers 10065, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Brunello, Giorgio & Rocco, Lorenzo, 2013. "The effect of immigration on the school performance of natives: Cross country evidence using PISA test scores," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 234-246.
    5. Dustmann, Christian & Glitz, Albrecht, 2011. "Migration and Education," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    6. Thomas Ahn & Christopher Jepsen, 2015. "The effect of sharing a mother tongue with peers: evidence from North Carolina middle schools," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-21, December.
    7. Brunello, Giorgio & Lodigiani, Elisabetta & Rocco, Lorenzo, 2017. "Does Low Skilled Immigration Cause Human Capital Polarization? Evidence from Italian Provinces," IZA Discussion Papers 11062, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Murray, Thomas J., 2016. "Public or private? The influence of immigration on native schooling choices in the United States," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 268-283.

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    Keywords

    Educational economics Human capital;

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