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Families, neighborhoods, and the future: The transition to adulthood of children of native and immigrant origin in Sweden

Author

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  • Szulkin, Ryszard

    (Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS)

  • Hällsten, Martin

    (Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS)

Abstract

In this paper, we examine mechanisms that generate gaps in educational attainment and labor market outcomes between children of immigrants and children of native Swedes. Theoretical explanations of how social inequality between generations is (re)produced focus on a relative lack of resources within the family and/or in the broader social environment, particularly in neighborhoods and schools. In the empirical analyses we follow over time all individuals who completed compulsory school during the period 1990 -1995 and analyze what types of background factors have influenced their educational and labor market careers, which are measured for the year 2007. On the basis of our empirical results we conclude that the gaps between children of immigrants and children of native Swedes are mainly generated by differences in various forms of resources in the family of origin. The role of neighborhood segregation is less substantial. Moreover, our results indicate that the gaps in employment are larger than the corresponding gaps in educational attainment. When gainfully employed, children of immigrants born in Sweden follow roughly the same path as children from native families in contrast to children born abroad.

Suggested Citation

  • Szulkin, Ryszard & Hällsten, Martin, 2009. "Families, neighborhoods, and the future: The transition to adulthood of children of native and immigrant origin in Sweden," SULCIS Working Papers 2009:9, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sulcis:2009_009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hällsten, Martin & Sarnecki, Jerzy & Szulkin, Ryszard, 2011. "Crime as a Price of Inequality? The Delinquency Gap between Children of Immigrants and Children of Native Swedes," SULCIS Working Papers 2011:1, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
    2. Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Katz, Katarina & Österberg, Torun, 2016. "Why Do Some Young Adults Not Graduate from Upper Secondary School? On the Importance of Signals of Labour Market Failure," IZA Discussion Papers 9886, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inequality; education; labor market; children of immigrants;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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