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Do Domestic Educations Even Out the Playing Field? Ethnic Labor Market Gaps in Sweden

  • Nekby, Lena

    ()

    (Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS)

  • Özcan, Gülay

    ()

    (Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS)

The importance of investing in host country-specific human capital such as domestic language proficiency and domestic education is often cited as a determining factor for the labor market success of immigrants. This suggests that entirely domestic educations should even out the playing field providing equal labor market opportunities for natives and immigrants with similar (domestic) educations. This study follows a cohort of students from Swedish compulsory school graduation in 1988 until 2002 in order to document ethnic differences in education, including grades and field of education, and subsequent labor market outcomes. Results indicate both initial differences in youth labor market status and long term differences in employment rates, most notably for those with Non-European backgrounds. Differences in level or field of domestic education cannot explain persistent employment gaps. However, employment gaps are driven by differences among those with secondary school only. No employment or income gaps are found for the university educated.

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Paper provided by Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS in its series SULCIS Working Papers with number 2007:3.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 25 May 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published as Nekby, Lena and Gülay Özcan, 'Do Host Country Educations Even Out the Playing Field? Immigrant-Native Labor Market Gaps in Sweden' in Journal Of Immigrant and Refugee Studies, 2008, pages 168-196.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:sulcis:2007_003
Contact details of provider: Postal: Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden
Web page: http://www.su.se/sulcis

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