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Are women or men better team managers? Evidence from professional team sports

Author

Listed:
  • Helmut Dietl

    () (Department of Business Administration, University of Zurich)

  • Carlos Gomez-Gonzalez

    () (Facultad Derecho y CC. Soziales, University of Castilla-La Mancha)

  • Cornel Nesseler

    () (Department of Business Administration, University of Zurich)

Abstract

We empirically compare the performance of female and male team managers. We find that female team managers never perform worse than male team managers and that females work under significantly worse conditions than males. Additionally, we find that specialized experience has no influence. Special- 1 ized experience means having worked previously as an employee in the same industry. Our dataset consists of female and male managers in women soccer leagues acroos countries, viz., France, Germany, and Norway. Managers in team sports usually have exactly the same tasks (selection, coordination, and motivation of team members) as team managers in other industries. The limited number of women in top management positions in some of these industries and the lack of available data do not often allow comparisons. Our study, which includes a fair number of female team managers and a clear measurement of performance, can help understanding stereotypical behaviors. Therefore, our results have important implications for industries, companies, and clubs who oppose employing female team managers.

Suggested Citation

  • Helmut Dietl & Carlos Gomez-Gonzalez & Cornel Nesseler, 2017. " Are women or men better team managers? Evidence from professional team sports," Working Papers 364, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zrh:wpaper:364
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Performance; Female managers; discrimination; Working conditions;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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