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Unemployment and labor reallocation in Europe

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  • Hogrefe, Jan
  • Sachs, Andreas

Abstract

We ask whether sectoral shocks and the subsequent labor reallocation are responsible for unemployment within selected European economies. Our measure of sectoral labor reallocation is adjusted for aggregate influences and the remaining variation is linked to unemployment in country specific dynamic models. For Spain, the ADL-model estimation reveals a significant impact of sectoral reallocation on unemployment that goes beyond usual business cycle patterns. In Italy, there is weaker yet detectable evidence for this mechanism. In Ireland, Portugal and France, no significant influence of sector level shocks on unemployment is found. The results emphasize the potential structural supply side policies have for reducing unemployment in Spain.

Suggested Citation

  • Hogrefe, Jan & Sachs, Andreas, 2014. "Unemployment and labor reallocation in Europe," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-083, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:14083
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    Cited by:

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    2. Bakas, Dimitrios & Panagiotidis, Theodore & Pelloni, Gianluigi, 2016. "On the significance of labour reallocation for European unemployment: Evidence from a panel of 15 countries," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(PB), pages 229-240.
    3. Joanna Tyrowicz & Lucas Velde & Jan Svejnar, 2017. "Effects Of Labor Reallocation On Productivity And Inequality—Insights From Studies On Transition," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(3), pages 712-732, July.
    4. Muhammad Azam & Faisal Khan & Khalid Zaman & Amran Md. Rasli, 2016. "Military Expenditures and Unemployment Nexus for Selected South Asian Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(3), pages 1103-1117, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    unemployment; sectoral shocks; labor reallocation; Europe;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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