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Why do people stay? Insider advantages and immobility

Author

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  • Fischer, Peter A.
  • Holm, Einar
  • Malmberg, Gunnar
  • Straubhaar, Thomas

Abstract

The low mobility of people in Europe is considered a problem for adjustment to asymmetric shocks and regional convergence in the European Monetary Union. We suggest a complement to the traditional migration theories, the insider advantages approach to explain why most Europeans prefer to stay. Staying immobile they have accumulated work- and leisure-oriented insider advantages that are location-specific and would be lost in the case of emigration. Therefore, the longer people have stayed -and the more insider advantages they have accumulated-, the less likely they are to move. Using a new micro dataset covering all people resident in Sweden in 1994 and their mobility experience since 1985, we find a strong positive duration dependence of the probability to stay. Traditional micro-economic characteristics prove helpful in explaining immobility, while regional macro-economic differences have surprisingly little impact on individual mobility decisions. A large proportion of the moves between Swedish labour markets seem to be related to specific life-course events rather than to pure labour market issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Fischer, Peter A. & Holm, Einar & Malmberg, Gunnar & Straubhaar, Thomas, 2000. "Why do people stay? Insider advantages and immobility," HWWA Discussion Papers 112, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwadp:26310
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/19439/1/112.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Friedberg, Rachel M, 2000. "You Can't Take It with You? Immigrant Assimilation and the Portability of Human Capital," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(2), pages 221-251, April.
    8. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Drinkwater, 2003. "Go West? Assessing the willingness to move from Central and Eastern European Countries," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0503, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    2. Tanja El-Cherkeh & Max Steinhardt & Thomas Straubhaar, 2006. "Did the European Free Movement of Persons and Residence Directive Change Migration Patterns within the EU? A First Glance," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 4(4), pages 14-20, 02.
    3. Anders Boman, 2011. "The Mobility of Immigrants and Natives: Evidence from Internal Migration Following Job Displacement," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 283-297.
    4. Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "Migration in an Enlarged EU: A Challenging Solution?," IZA Discussion Papers 3913, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. repec:bla:labour:v:31:y:2017:i:4:p:457-479 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Maier, Michael F. & Sprietsma, Maresa, 2016. "Does it pay to move? Returns to regional mobility at the start of the career for tertiary education graduates," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-060, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. repec:ces:ifodic:v:4:y:2006:i:4:p:14567434 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Peter Huber & Klaus Nowotny, 2013. "Moving across Borders: Who is Willing to Migrate or to Commute?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(9), pages 1462-1481, October.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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