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Ready for boarding? The effects of a boarding school for disadvantaged students

Listed author(s):
  • Behaghel, Luc

    (Paris School of Economics - INRA)

  • de Chaisemartin, Clement

    (Department of Economics, University of Warwick)

  • Gurgand, Marc

    (Paris School of Economics - CNRS)

Boarding schools substitute school to home, but little is known on the effects this substitution produces on students. We present results of an experiment in which seats in a boarding school for disadvantaged students were randomly allocated. Boarders enjoy better studying conditions than control students. However, they start outperforming control students in mathematics only two years after admission, and this effect mostly comes from strong students. After one year, levels of well-being are lower among boarders, but in their second year, students adjust: well-being catches-up. This suggests that substituting school to home is disruptive: only strong students benefit from the boarding school, once they have managed to adapt to their new environment.

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File URL: https://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/workingpapers/2015/twerp_1059_chaisemartin.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Warwick, Department of Economics in its series The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) with number 1059.

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Date of creation: 2015
Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:1059
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