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Next please! Estimating the effect of treatments allocated by randomized waiting lists

Author

Listed:
  • Clement de Chaisemartin
  • Luc Behaghel

Abstract

Oversubscribed treatments are often allocated using randomized waiting lists. Applicants are ranked randomly, and treatment offers are made following that ranking until all seats are filled. To estimate causal effects, researchers often compare applicants getting and not getting an offer. We show that those two groups are not statistically comparable. Therefore, the estimators arising from that comparison are biased and inconsistent. We propose new estimators, and we show that they are unbiased and consistent. Finally, we revisit two applications and we show that using our estimators can lead to sizably different results from those obtained using the commonly used estimators.

Suggested Citation

  • Clement de Chaisemartin & Luc Behaghel, 2015. "Next please! Estimating the effect of treatments allocated by randomized waiting lists," Papers 1511.01453, arXiv.org, revised Dec 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1511.01453
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