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Estimates of the impact of static and dynamic knowledge spillovers on regional factor productivity

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  • Manfred M. Fischer

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  • James P. LeSage

Abstract

We develop an empirical approach to examine static and dynamic knowledge externalities in the context of a regional total factor productivity relationship. Static externalities refer to current period scale or industry-size effects which have been labeled localization externalities or region-size effects known as agglomeration externalities. Dynamic externalities refer to the relationship between accumulated or prior period knowledge and current levels of innovation, where past learning-by-doing makes innovation positively related to cumulative production over time. Our empirical specification allows for the presence of both static and dynamic externalities, and provides a way to assess the relative magnitude of spillovers associated with spillovers from these two types of knowledge externalities. The magnitude of own-region impacts and other-region (spillovers) can be assessed using scalar summary measures of the own- and cross-partial derivatives from the model. We find evidence supporting the presence of dynamic externalities as well as static, and our estimates suggest that dynamic externalities may have a larger magnitude of impact than static externalities.

Suggested Citation

  • Manfred M. Fischer & James P. LeSage, 2011. "Estimates of the impact of static and dynamic knowledge spillovers on regional factor productivity," ERSA conference papers ersa11p31, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa11p31
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rachel Griffith & Stephen Redding & John Van Reenen, 2004. "Mapping the Two Faces of R&D: Productivity Growth in a Panel of OECD Industries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(4), pages 883-895, November.
    2. John Van Reenen & Rupert Harrison & Rachel Griffith, 2006. "How Special Is the Special Relationship? Using the Impact of U.S. R&D Spillovers on U.K. Firms as a Test of Technology Sourcing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1859-1875, December.
    3. Cem Ertur & Wilfried Koch, 2007. "Growth, technological interdependence and spatial externalities: theory and evidence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(6), pages 1033-1062.
    4. Corinne Autant-Bernard, 2001. "The Geography Of Knowledge Spillovers And Technological Proximity," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 237-254.
    5. Corinne Autant‐Bernard & James P. LeSage, 2011. "Quantifying Knowledge Spillovers Using Spatial Econometric Models," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 471-496, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Miranda, Karen & Manjón Antolín, Miguel C. & Martínez Ibáñez, Oscar, 2018. "Growth, heterogeneous technological interdependence,and spatial externalities: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers 2072/307363, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    2. Scherngell, Thomas & Borowiecki, Martin & Hu, Yuanjia, 2014. "Effects of knowledge capital on total factor productivity in China: A spatial econometric perspective," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 82-94.
    3. James LeSage & Yuxue Sheng, 2014. "A spatial econometric panel data examination of endogenous versus exogenous interaction in Chinese province-level patenting," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 233-262, July.
    4. Brown, Jason & Lambert, Dayton, 2014. "Location decisions of natural gas extraction establishments: a smooth transition count model approach," Research Working Paper RWP 14-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    5. Raffaele Paci & Emanuela Marrocu, 2013. "Knowledge Assets and Regional Performance," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(2), pages 228-257, June.
    6. Demidova, Olga, 2014. "Spatial-autoregressive model for the two groups of related regions (eastern and western parts of Russia)," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 34(2), pages 19-35.
    7. Vicente Rios & Pedro Pascual Arzoz & BelÉn iraizoz Apezteguia, 2016. "Development Differentials and Interaction Effects in the European Regions: A Study Based on the Regional Lisbon Index," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 107(3), pages 347-364, July.

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