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Globalization and Investment in Human Capital

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Abstract

Workers are becoming increasingly concerned about the impact that globalization has on their domestic labor market. While existing research typically focuses on the effects on labor market outcomes such as wages and employment, we examine whether American workers respond to globalization by increasing their investment in human capital. Specifically, we measure the extent to which offshoring and immigration affect enrollment at institutions of higher education. The results indicate that both offshoring and immigration increase enrollment at community colleges, particularly among older students. We conclude that workers in the U.S. are responding to offshoring and immigration by acquiring the skills necessary to compete in a global economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel C. Hickman & William W. Olney, 2010. "Globalization and Investment in Human Capital," Department of Economics Working Papers 2010-16, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  • Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2010-16
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    Cited by:

    1. Petri Böckerman & Mika Maliranta, 2013. "Outsourcing, Occupational Restructuring, and Employee Well-Being: Is There a Silver Lining?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(4), pages 878-914, October.
    2. Gu, Grace Weishi & Malik, Samreen & Pozzoli, Dario & Rocha, Vera, 2016. "Trade Induced Skill Upgrading: Lessons from the Danish and Portuguese Experiences," IZA Discussion Papers 10035, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Emily Blanchard & William W. Olney, 2013. "Globalization and Human Capital Investment: How Export Composition Drives Educational Attainment," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-18, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Mar 2015.
    4. repec:bla:worlde:v:40:y:2017:i:6:p:1089-1104 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Davidson, Carl & Sly, Nicholas, 2014. "A simple model of globalization, schooling and skill acquisition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 209-227.
    6. Jamilov, Rustam, 2012. "Channels of Monetary Transmission in the CIS," MPRA Paper 39568, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Ftergioti, Stamatia, 2017. "Neighbors and Friends: The Effect of Globalization on Party Positions," MPRA Paper 76662, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:eee:inecon:v:106:y:2017:i:c:p:165-183 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Blanchard, Emily & Willmann, Gerald, 2016. "Trade, education, and the shrinking middle class," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 263-278.
    10. Greenland, Andrew & Lopresti, John, 2016. "Import exposure and human capital adjustment: Evidence from the U.S," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 50-60.
    11. Chletsos, Michael & Roupakias, Stelios, 2016. "Do Immigrants Compete with Natives in the Greek Labour Market? Evidence from the Skill-Cell Approach Before and During the Great Recession," MPRA Paper 75659, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Globalization; Higher education; Enrollment; Offshoring; Immigration;

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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